Designed my first font for a fashion brand logo. How did I do so far?

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Comments

  • edited December 2019
    So, yeah. I'm not entirely convinced by the looks of these mockups, and since I'm starting to run short on time I can't spend to much effort in them.
    I couldn't find any good ones for free, so I had to edit one to fit my standards (or at least I tried, since I'm not really good at photoshop) and the other one had to make it completely from sratch.
    And I still have to gain some experience in color combinations and how to apply them propperly too...

  • I'm no expert but that looks pretty great to me :)
  • Same here, especially in the second image. Class.
  • edited December 2019
    Alright, so to give closure to this thread for now these are the final changes. There may even be a few tiny tweaks to be made, but I'm not going to bother you posting them here for the sake of closure.
    I want to say thank you so freaking much guys, this wouldn't be possible without your help. Thank you!

    Here are the final results.

    • Increased white space on straight stems.
    • Adjusted the kerning a bit.

    Color Version


    Alternate Version

    And another mockup


    Again. Thank you so much Type Drawers, this wouldn't have been possible without you. <3

    I'll be back soon with more types for logos




  • I'll be back soon with more types for logos

    Looking forward to it :)

  • Looks good! You might embolden the strokes on the reversed-out versions a hair, to counter the optical illusion of the white getting eaten up. I also would narrow the wordspace in the unstacked version. Sorry, I’m a compulsive feedback-giver!
  • edited December 2019
    Hahahah ok, will do!
    About the reversed-out versions, they are actually a bit thinner than their black counterparts, because I read somewhere that white over black it optically feels heavier. Maybe I overdid it with the compensation heh :#
  • Thomas PhinneyThomas Phinney Posts: 1,856
    edited December 2019
    Hahahah ok, will do!
    About the reversed-out versions, they are actually a bit thinner than their black counterparts, because I read somewhere that white over black it optically feels heavier. Maybe I overdid it with the compensation heh :#
    This all depends entirely on the medium.

    If it is for screen use, then yes, white over black feels heavier. Light bleeds over the adjacent dark pixels a bit. You are painting with light, essentially. How much bleed you get depends on the size of the glyphs in pixels, and how bright the screen is.

    If it is for print use, then instead, @Craig Eliason is correct. The black ink will bleed a little into the white space from the output process. How much depends on the size, the particular print process used, and potentially the substrate (paper) as well.

    In both cases, the effect is stronger at smaller sizes.
  • Hahahah ok, will do!
    About the reversed-out versions, they are actually a bit thinner than their black counterparts, because I read somewhere that white over black it optically feels heavier. Maybe I overdid it with the compensation heh :#
    This all depends entirely on the medium.

    If it is for screen use, then yes, white over black feels heavier. Light bleeds over the adjacent dark pixels a bit. You are painting with light, essentially. How much bleed you get depends on the size of the glyphs in pixels, and how bright the screen is.

    If it is for print use, then instead, @Craig Eliason is correct. The black ink will bleed a little into the white space from the output process. How much depends on the size, the particular print process used, and potentially the substrate (paper) as well.

    In both cases, the effect is stronger at smaller sizes.
    And I guess that if it’s embroidered and not printed, it all depends on how that will play out.
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