Affinity 2.0

Cory MaylettCory Maylett Posts: 235
edited November 2022 in Miscellaneous News
Affinity released its much-anticipated version 2.0 of Designer, Publisher, and Photo today. For professional graphic designers, Affinity is the primary competitor to Adobe's Illustrator, InDesign, and Photoshop.

Unfortunately, the upgrade still provides no support for variable fonts. As a graphic designer, I was hoping to finally sever my ties to the Adobe subscription model and switch full-time to Affinity, but that won't be happening yet.

Comments

  • Too bad. I am sure they had other things to pursue, but that renders Affinity apps pretty useless to me for design work.
  • John HudsonJohn Hudson Posts: 2,533
    Any improvement in their non-Latin support yet?
  • I haven't tested that myself, but people on the Affinity forums are complaining about the update's lack of support for right-to-left text, so I suspect nothing's changed regarding non-Latin scripts.
  • Nothing changed!! Wow, just wow.
  • I don’t disagree with the criticisms made above (and I have some of my own), but I think it’s worth noting that with the launch of version 2, Affinity Publisher now has footnotes, which is a more substantial feature improvement than InDesign has received in a decade. Footnotes may be low‐hanging fruit compared to global text layout, but it certainly gives me a sense that real progress is still being made. At a meager $40, investing in continued development feels like the steal of the year to me.
  • I don’t disagree with the criticisms made above (and I have some of my own), but I think it’s worth noting that with the launch of version 2, Affinity Publisher now has footnotes, which is a more substantial feature improvement than InDesign has received in a decade. Footnotes may be low‐hanging fruit compared to global text layout, but it certainly gives me a sense that real progress is still being made. At a meager $40, investing in continued development feels like the steal of the year to me.
    Yes, footnotes, endnotes and side notes. All of which can be used in conjunction with each other.

    However, without the ability to map styles, text import is still a pita. As well, too many reports of footnotes coming in without the original's formatting--for instance, all in small caps, a different font with overrides, etc.

    Still no scripting. No tagged text import (which I use a lot).

    I still don't believe it's ready for primetime usage.
  • It took InDesign until CS2 (version 4) to get footnotes, so in one sense, that is pretty quick for Affinity!

    On the other hand, that was April 2005. InDesign added that function over 17 years ago, so comparing the current speed of progress between the two apps seems a bit wacky. Affinity could progress faster for many years, without catching up.
  • This is sad… I was considering to upgrade but I think Thomas observations are very solid. :-(
  • Claudio PiccininiClaudio Piccinini Posts: 645
    edited January 25
    Am I wrong or does it seem like it does not even have support for full numerals OpenType features (i.e. Lining Tabular, Oldstyle Tabular, etc.)?
    EDIT: It's probably me… Things are just sorted differently.
  • It does offer the various number styles, style sets, character variant, ligatures, etc.
  • John ButlerJohn Butler Posts: 68
    edited January 27
    Speaking of low-hanging fruit, does Affinity 2.0 happen to still support Type 1 fonts? I still have a few dozen I bought 30 years ago that would cost over $2,000 to replace with OTF, including an untainted, pre-Hunt Berthold Bodoni Old Face. IIRC Adobe Creative Cloud recently ditched Type 1 support.

    I bought Publisher 1.0 as an impulse purchase myself. I had the same mix of success and frustration Evie reports. Eventually I decided Scribus was more worth my time to learn to use, for the kinds of documents I build at least. It has its own frustrations. I still want Affinity Publisher to succeed and grow.
  • Mark SimonsonMark Simonson Posts: 1,511
    edited January 27
    FWIW, Illustrator 2023 and InDesign 2023 still appear to support Type 1 fonts (for now), but Photoshop 2023 hasn't since it was released last October. 

    It's possible to keep older versions of CC apps installed alongside the current version. But I tried this, installing Photoshop 2021, and it doesn't recognize Type 1 fonts either. Presumably this is because it depends on some low level CC system framework (not part of the Photoshop app itself) that gets removed with the 2023 version install.

    I wonder if this presents an opportunity for a third party to make a plug-in for Adobe apps that would restore Type 1 support, assuming that's even possible.
  • I still have a few dozen I bought 30 years ago that would cost over $2,000 to replace with OTF, including an untainted, pre-Hunt Berthold Bodoni Old Face. IIRC Adobe Creative Cloud recently ditched Type 1 support.

    Check your EULAs. I have a very old license for BQ Whittingham. It allows one to "convert and install the FONT SOFTWARE into another format in other environments." But: "the converted FONT SOFTWARE is used only for your own customary internal business or personal use".

  • Mark SimonsonMark Simonson Posts: 1,511
    edited January 27
    @John Butler To answer your question: Yes, Affinity still supports Type 1 fonts. I think as long as the host OS supports them, Affinity does.

    (Which makes me wonder why Adobe didn't use the still-existing OS level Type 1 support instead of completely dropping it. There are probably reasons.)
  • Mark SimonsonMark Simonson Posts: 1,511
    edited January 27
    I notice that kerning doesn't work with some Type 1 fonts in Affinity apps. But the same is true with the same fonts in other apps that use Apple's font rendering (e.g., TextEdit), so probably not something Affinity can fix.
  • John HudsonJohn Hudson Posts: 2,533
    (Which makes me wonder why Adobe didn't use the still-existing OS level Type 1 support instead of completely dropping it. There are probably reasons.)
    Adobe has avoided OS-reliance for font handling and text rendering for a long time. It is part of their policy of maintaining cross-platform feature compatibility in their software: they don’t want to be dependent on anything that Apple or Microsoft might independently change.
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