Affinity 2.0

Cory MaylettCory Maylett Posts: 227
edited November 9 in Miscellaneous News
Affinity released its much-anticipated version 2.0 of Designer, Publisher, and Photo today. For professional graphic designers, Affinity is the primary competitor to Adobe's Illustrator, InDesign, and Photoshop.

Unfortunately, the upgrade still provides no support for variable fonts. As a graphic designer, I was hoping to finally sever my ties to the Adobe subscription model and switch full-time to Affinity, but that won't be happening yet.

Comments

  • Thomas PhinneyThomas Phinney Posts: 2,367
    Too bad. I am sure they had other things to pursue, but that renders Affinity apps pretty useless to me for design work.
  • John HudsonJohn Hudson Posts: 2,483
    Any improvement in their non-Latin support yet?
  • I haven't tested that myself, but people on the Affinity forums are complaining about the update's lack of support for right-to-left text, so I suspect nothing's changed regarding non-Latin scripts.
  • Nothing changed!! Wow, just wow.
  • I don’t disagree with the criticisms made above (and I have some of my own), but I think it’s worth noting that with the launch of version 2, Affinity Publisher now has footnotes, which is a more substantial feature improvement than InDesign has received in a decade. Footnotes may be low‐hanging fruit compared to global text layout, but it certainly gives me a sense that real progress is still being made. At a meager $40, investing in continued development feels like the steal of the year to me.
  • I don’t disagree with the criticisms made above (and I have some of my own), but I think it’s worth noting that with the launch of version 2, Affinity Publisher now has footnotes, which is a more substantial feature improvement than InDesign has received in a decade. Footnotes may be low‐hanging fruit compared to global text layout, but it certainly gives me a sense that real progress is still being made. At a meager $40, investing in continued development feels like the steal of the year to me.
    Yes, footnotes, endnotes and side notes. All of which can be used in conjunction with each other.

    However, without the ability to map styles, text import is still a pita. As well, too many reports of footnotes coming in without the original's formatting--for instance, all in small caps, a different font with overrides, etc.

    Still no scripting. No tagged text import (which I use a lot).

    I still don't believe it's ready for primetime usage.
  • It took InDesign until CS2 (version 4) to get footnotes, so in one sense, that is pretty quick for Affinity!

    On the other hand, that was April 2005. InDesign added that function over 17 years ago, so comparing the current speed of progress between the two apps seems a bit wacky. Affinity could progress faster for many years, without catching up.
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