Interminable neon

From the cover of a truly horrible 1973 record album by Christopher Scott. (The title piggy-backs Wendy Carlos’ epochal 1968 Switched on Bach, which programmed Bach on the Moog synthesizer, becoming a million-seller. Burt Bacharach composed many pop hits in the sixties.)

I assume this is based on a typeface, but I don’t know which; a bit like ITC Neon.

The “ligaturing” is quite interesting!




Comments

  • In my opinion, someone started with "S" from ITC Neon and let imagination run wild...

  • Chris LozosChris Lozos Posts: 1,190
    I think it was all hand lettered from the get-go.  We did this all the time then.  Frankly, this is not that well done.  The "W" is the least acceptable.

  • Seems like it was probably drawn from scratch with a heavy toke.

    (Incidentally, Switched on Bach was performed, not programmed. No computers or sequencers involved.)
  • Nick ShinnNick Shinn Posts: 1,458
    Sorry, the wrong word. But it wasn’t played live, as “performance” would suggest, but pieced together a few notes at a time, as I understand.
  • I think this could be done with ligatures and a system of top and bottom entry strokes. I had this on 8-track...so terrible. The instrumentation was okay but the lead parts were played completely soulless. Walk on By sticks in my mind as being particularly awful.
  • I'm pretty sure it's not inspired by neon but rather electric stovetop elements.
  • The "W" is the least acceptable.
    The /E is worse!
  • John SavardJohn Savard Posts: 502
    edited December 2019
    Sorry, the wrong word. But it wasn’t played live, as “performance” would suggest, but pieced together a few notes at a time, as I understand.
    The Moog synthesizer that Wendy Carlos used was monophonic, so each part had to be separately recorded, but despite a joke in the liner notes about a lot of splicing being required, the individual parts were played in the conventional musical sense.
    So basically it would have been one track at a time - not one selection on the album, but one track on a multi-track recorder - not a few notes at a time.
  • It's computed by an algorithm. Maybe inspired by ITC Neon, but very different. Compare the details of W, A, H, E.

    Take normal letters of this shape and then try to fill the areas with a rope (or wire) in one piece. It's a sort of maze-puzzle. Algorithms doing this better as a human were known at this time (e. g. for wiring printed electronic boards).
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