Macedonian italic /gje localization

References for the Serbian localization of Cyrillic generally cite б г д п т as those with different preferred cursive forms. These Serbian alternates are then also recommended for Macedonian localization.

But no mention is made about the Macedonian italic ѓ.

Do native users perceive /gje as distinctly different enough from /ghe that they don’t mind the visual incongruity of “Serbian” italic /ghe with “standard” italic /gje, as in the middle line below? Or should a complete SRB/MKD localization include changing the base of Macedonian /gje to match /ghe, as in the last line?



Comments

  • I suppose you could also stack the acute and the macron on the ı base.
  • Kent LewKent Lew Posts: 585
    Interesting point, Christian. And now I see that there is an image used widely across Wikipedia (including mk.wikipedia) that shows it this way : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macedonian_alphabet#/media/File:Macedonian_cursive_script.svg

    But, I also stumbled across a larger image of the 1945 decree adopting the official Macedonian alphabet, in which the cursive exemplar does not show that macron on the ѓ : https://mk.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Податотека:Mk_alphabet_decree.png&filetimestamp=20080514155054&

    Which to believe?
  • John SavardJohn Savard Posts: 29
    In a web search on this topic, I came across an image, said to show how handwriting is currently taught in schools in Macedonia, which shows that /gje has both the acute accent, and the horizontal bar beneath it, instead of omitting the horizontal bar.
  • Kent LewKent Lew Posts: 585
    John, can you provide a link to the image?
  • Michel BoyerMichel Boyer Posts: 57
    The site http://alati.org/font/ provides many pre unicode Macedonian cyrillic fonts and from what I see there, the preferred shape is

    There is however a font called "Mistral" with the following shape

    It looks like the i shape is the exception but if it is ever used, then the macron is to follow.
  • Michel BoyerMichel Boyer Posts: 57
    With Ariston Extra bold you also get the shapes

  • Michel BoyerMichel Boyer Posts: 57
    edited June 14
    The question was asked before, for noto. Here is a relevant link: https://github.com/googlei18n/noto-fonts/issues/794#issuecomment-266732458 


  • what I wonder about is this:


  • Kent LewKent Lew Posts: 585
    Thanks to all for your contributions.

    Do we have anyone in the community from the Balkan region with firsthand experience of local preferences?
  • Maxim ZhukovMaxim Zhukov Posts: 37
    edited June 14
    what I wonder about is this: ⟨…⟩
    The forms on the right are usable only in Serbian and Macedonian typography.


  • Kent LewKent Lew Posts: 585
    @Maxim Zhukov — do you have any experience/opinion about the Macedonian ѓ?

    For example, as shown here in Corbel Italic and Minion Italic, do you think the seemingly logical mismatch between Serbian г and standard ѓ is perfectly acceptable to Macedonian users?




  • John HudsonJohn Hudson Posts: 1,091
    edited June 15
    My two deni worth:

    I don't think it makes sense to have the typical Russian etc. cursive form of г with acute in Macedonian typography if the localised form is used for г without acute. As far as I know, the information provided in the Noto GitHub link that Michel posted above is reliable. The 'locl' feature substitutions for Macedonian should be extended to cover ѓ.

    I'll be making this revision to the Brill fonts in the next update.

    I don't have information indicating that ѓ is used in any alphabet other than Macedonian; however, I would be wary of making the localised italic form of this glyph the default, just in case it does show up anywhere else. Also, in case of failure of the 'locl' feature, it wouldn't be good to end up with Macedonian ѓ and Russian г — when failing, better to fail consistently.
  • Maxim ZhukovMaxim Zhukov Posts: 37
    Dear Kent, I am no expert in Macedonian writing and typography. All I can say is that whereas the overstrike bars on the г, п, and т are stylistical features, originally meant for disambiguation, the acute is a diacritic.
  • Kent LewKent Lew Posts: 585
    John & Maxim — Thank you both for your perspectives.
  • Michel BoyerMichel Boyer Posts: 57
    edited June 17
    I googled
    македонски текстови filetype:pdf
    and found a few texts with italics. Most were using the Russian italics but when not, most often the following choice was made:

    That is how Myriad Pro was modified in the pdf ЕТИКАТА ВО НОВИНАРСТВОТО

    An interesting specimen is this report for the unicef where on top of page 108 we see "Russian italics" and just below "Macedonian italics"

    ps There is a nice booklet produced by the Macedonian national theater using Lasko Dzurovski's free font Skola that you can download here.
  • Kent LewKent Lew Posts: 585
    Thanks for these links, Michel. It is also interesting to me that none of these Macedonian examples uses a “Serbian” б.
  • Michel BoyerMichel Boyer Posts: 57
    edited June 17
    Kent, I found very few different italic fonts with Macedonian support. An additional font is Times New roman, used in those proceedings (576 pages) where this time the "macron" is kept with the accent, again on top of a standard cyrillic letter GHE. The б is as in the files above.
  • Stefan PeevStefan Peev Posts: 1
    This table is made by Lasko Dzurovski (Macedonian typographer, author of StobiSerif Pro – an official font for Macedonian goverment documents).



    You could look at this place on Local Fonts also. It is for Macedonian Cyrillic Feature Locl. I asked Lasko Dzurovski to confirm that the explanation is correct and I have his confirmation.

  • I think that overview by Lasko Dzurovski is a most worthwhile reference. Only one thing I’m wondering about: in the Bulgarian column (Regular) it records a flat-top de but a pointed-top el. Is that consistent?
  • Michel BoyerMichel Boyer Posts: 57
    edited June 23
    The table reproduced above is under "handwritten script" in the "Local fonts" link. The  МК (Macedonian) italics in the first part of the same link look different. 


  • Thomas PhinneyThomas Phinney Posts: 734
    For those who are unfamiliar with Cyrillic and the abbreviations involved for various countries/languages I believe the headings across the top are: Macedonian, Bulgarian, Russian, Serbian.
  • John SavardJohn Savard Posts: 29
    edited June 23
    Only one thing I’m wondering about: in the Bulgarian column (Regular) it records a flat-top de but a pointed-top el. Is that consistent?
    Whether or not it is consistent, I suspect, even with my very limited acquaintance with the Slavic languages, that it is correct. Stylish Russian fonts will sometimes make the letter L look like a Greek lambda. But if you tried to make the letter D look like a Greek delta, you are making a more extreme change, although not one that's impossible - if, and only if, your typeface is caps-only and sans-serif.

    For those who are unfamiliar with Cyrillic and the abbreviations involved for various countries/languages I believe the headings across the top are: Macedonian, Bulgarian, Russian, Serbian.
    Oh, I'm sure you are correct. But I'm amazed that the Macedonian names for the two styles of printing being illustrated are "Regular" and "Italik".
  • Michel BoyerMichel Boyer Posts: 57
    edited 1:28AM

    Lasko Dzurovski  has the font Skorid on MyFonts where you can try those substitutions as stylistic sets. Here is one of his figures.


    Aside from unicode codepoints that seem to have been merged for Serbian, that leaves me wondering which substitutions are considered to be normative and which are rather stylistic.

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