Project cost

Hello

I hope you doing well guys, I have a new Arabic font system different from than regular Arabic font style. I am in a plan to invest in my creation and make a cost estimate for starting to get the project fund. this project starts from scratch so I need your help guys to figure out these questions.

Where I should start?
What the cost of the requirements?

If I want to make the new type system useable in all operating systems environments, online and smart devices

Thanks

Comments

  • John HudsonJohn Hudson Posts: 1,873
    That's really not enough detail on which to base advice. Can you explain what you mean by 'new font system'? Is this a new style of typeface design, a new way of performing Arabic text layout within an existing font technology such as OpenType, or a completely new font/layout technology?
  • Kaled ManaKaled Mana Posts: 19
    Hi John

    It is a project to apply high logic to the characters of Arabic calligraphy in separated upper and lower cases like the English typeface. In Arabic classic style, there are 4 positions for each glyph but in my style, it will be only 2 positions. 

    Visit the link below you will find more detailed discussions about the idea.

    https://typedrawers.com/discussion/comment/46037#Comment_46037

    You already there John
  • AzizMostafaAzizMostafa Posts: 75
    edited May 12
    Dear Kaled Mana, I guess you are thinking of the old Arabic Typewrite that was of interest to our Palastinan Japanese friend who passed away a couple of years ago, Mr.Vladimir Tamari, God bless his soul. Hope his still-running website help http://vladimirtamari.com/777.html.

    2. Why not make use of the new technologies?!
    https://typedrawers.com/discussion/3631/flying-high-quranic-arabic-jawi-pegon-gundul-fonts

    3. Making use of Telegram? https://telegram.org/
    Please go explore my private link https://t.me/FonJawi

    Hope to see you on Telegram soon.

    All the Best with Flowers https://t.me/FlowerCrosswords
  • AzizMostafaAzizMostafa Posts: 75
    edited May 12
    Sorry of the duplicated post!
  • Kaled ManaKaled Mana Posts: 19
    Hi Aziz 

    It is not a classic Arabic font but it is a new creation set developed Arabic glyphs in high logic style like letters in Latin fonts families in tow cases upper and lower positions.

    Check this link for all 28 letters to clear the idea.

    https://twitter.com/Kaledm74/status/1216698924926410752/photo/1

    Sorry, I don't use Telegram only Twitter.

    Nice to pass 
  • Christian ThalmannChristian Thalmann Posts: 1,525
    edited May 12
    One «cheap and dirty» way to do it would be to map your glyphs onto the Latin characters. You only have 2 more characters than the basic Latin alphabet, and you could use some easily accessible accented characters to map the rest to. It's how the Greek font Symbol used to work in the earliest versions of MacOS. It's a dirty hack, but it's free and supported absolutely everywhere where you can get your font to work (and that's a necessity in any case, since other people's fonts won't offer your characters at first).

    Perhaps less dirty: You could simply make an Arabic font where all four versions of a letter look identical. You could then use the Upright/Italic dimension to represent your lowercase/uppercase distinction. Of course, that doesn't work in as many environments as my previous suggestions because there is no such thing as Italic in plain text, for instance.
  • AzizMostafaAzizMostafa Posts: 75
    edited May 13
    Well Kaled Mana, none of your latin-like Alphabet looks like Arabic!
    I wonder how they will be written from right to left!

    Comparing Arabic and Latin Alphabet:

    1. Latin = Thirty-four (34) stand-alone, and almost dot-less letters.
    That's right: Thirty-four (34) letterforms without dots = Twenty-six (26) capitals + eight (8) lowercase letters (abdeghqr), not taking into account the differences in the other eighteen (18).

    Latin goes left-to-right by adding ends (tails) to the fifty (52) characters to make them cursive.

    2. Arabic: Dropping dots, nineteen (19) dancing letters, five (5) of them do not connect with the following ones, namely Alif, Waw, Dal, Ra and Hamza (ا،و،د،ر،ء), while the other fourteen (14) shrink ends when connecting one another making ligatures with three (3) namely Meem Ha, and Kh (م،هـ،ح), whereas they expand tails to overlap the other five, reflecting their positions in the word (in the beginning, middle, or end).

    Arabic goes right-to-left by changing (not adding) ends (tails) to the dancing letters then dotting some of them and adding marks wherever necessary.

  • Kaled ManaKaled Mana Posts: 19
    Hi Christian

    You're reviving hope again. map glyphs was the first thing I thought about to present the new font system to  public in general, to provide an opportunity for developers to get acquainted with the font then get experience and perhaps some artists deal with it. I used the Ariel font typeface table and I duplicate two glyphs to get to 28 complete Arabic tables and I change all the details of the Ariel font to something else, when test it on Word and Photoshop, the font was still Ariel same just like I wasn't doing anything.

    The question here is, how can I do that?
  • Kaled ManaKaled Mana Posts: 19
    edited May 13
    Hi Aziz

    The new script (Raqeem typeface )printing and writing differs from the classic Arabic Jazem script (خط الجزم) and all types of created fonts that evolved with Jazem script which we used now days. In my latest characters update for my new system, the number of dotted characters is reduced to 5 letters. This system is written from right to left and may neglect the diacritics in the beginning because it aims to achieve specific goals, not including codification or documentation. Some of those who had been introduced to the characters did not accept it, others accepted it. I note those who did not accept it were less educated or cultured.

  • AzizMostafaAzizMostafa Posts: 75
    Hi Aziz

    The new script (Raqeem typeface )printing and writing differs from the classic Arabic Jazem script (خط الجزم) and all types of created fonts that evolved with Jazem script which we used now days. In my latest characters update for my new system, the number of dotted characters is reduced to 5 letters. This system is written from right to left and may neglect the diacritics in the beginning because it aims to achieve specific goals, not including codification or documentation. Some of those who had been introduced to the characters did not accept it, others accepted it. I note those who did not accept it were less educated or cultured.
    Seeing is believing?
    Hope you don't mind uploading an image to a meaningful 3-word or longer phrase written in your yet-to-be-approved Arabic typeface.
  • Kaled ManaKaled Mana Posts: 19
    This is my novel cover I use Raqeem glyphs in some titles.





    visit the mesbec website you can find some phrases with Raqeem font and if you can read Arabic font there some articles about the Raqeem system.

    www.mesbec.com
  • Christian ThalmannChristian Thalmann Posts: 1,525
    I used the Ariel font typeface table and I duplicate two glyphs to get to 28 complete Arabic tables and I change all the details of the Ariel font to something else, when test it on Word and Photoshop, the font was still Ariel same just like I wasn't doing anything.
    I would advise against modifying Arial, since that's no doubt highly illegal. Just start a new font file, or use a libre font as a basis if you have to.
  • Thomas PhinneyThomas Phinney Posts: 1,865
    First, I agree that you shouldn’t modify Arial, that is just a Bad Idea. Legal issues, plus it is a default font for some apps. Worse, on newer versions of Windows is protected from being uninstalled—which makes it hard to upgrade and replace.

    Second, when you do something like that, you invite issues with caching of the original unmodified font. But this can also happen with consecutive versions of your own new font. You need to make sure the apps have forgotten about the original.

    With your own original font, usually you can just uninstall it, launch the app and start a new document, then quit the app, and install the new font version.

    I wrote a blog post about some of this a year and a half ago: https://www.thomasphinney.com/2018/11/changing-font-versions/
  • Kaled ManaKaled Mana Posts: 19
    edited May 14
    Hi Thomas
    All that I have no idea it will effect this way, better it wasn't work.
    Thanks for clearing
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