Comments

  • Jacob CasalJacob Casal Posts: 82
    Hey! May we know a little more about what you’re going for with this typeface before we give much critique? :)
    It looks to me like some of it’s going for a faux-3D pop-out effect. It reminded me of those tests optometrists use for the patient to point out the graphic that appears to come off the page. Letters like /O,/N,/A,/Q,/@ especially pop out. It could just be my eyes playing a trick on me though. I understand you probably made the counters of the /B and /8 smaller for balance, but maybe open them up just a wee bit more;the same goes for the black counter of the /@. Something is bothering me about that /V, but I can’t quite put my finger on it. Strokes feel too thin? Form is bit too wide maybe? Pulling to the left a little?
    While not wholly a novice anymore I am still inexperienced, so take of my advice what you will. It looks like a pretty fun typeface though.
  • Adam JagoszAdam Jagosz Posts: 336
    edited April 12
    /H looks unapologetically light because of the crossbar. I would rethink the /E — maybe make the top (and bottom) stroke match that of /A /N /O etc. (the “primary” width) and make the crossbar lighter. For /B maybe a triangular structure like for /G?
  • Rob BarbaRob Barba Posts: 40
    Gotta say, I'm loving the negative space asperand (the /@).  I definitely agree with Adam that the /E needs to be tweaked a bit.  The /V does look a tad thin.
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 361
    edited April 12

    Purpose: heavy display.
    /E looks fine to me. lc /e and /i may get some unicase treatment tho.
  • Jacob CasalJacob Casal Posts: 82
    I know I’m a bit late in saying this, but based on how most of your “curved” letters (/B, /C, /J, /O, etc.) have their edges sawed off at an angle perhaps you could try applying that more to the /G as well. On the one hand, its lack of that feature (aside from the counter) makes it pop out more. On the other hand, having one or two angled edges could create a little more harmony with the other “curved” letters. I am a little curious as to how the flags on the /H and /I would affect presentation for words where they don’t fit so snugly (as we see here slightly with the /H next to /G). You already have open spacing with letters like /T, /V, /J, and /Y, but that would really open up a gap if a letter like /T came before an /H or /I.
    On an unrelated note, to Rob’s comment, if one were to name the /@ as an analogue of ampersand ((&)and per se and) I always felt it would make more sense to call it an atpersat or apersat (@ per se at), but looking into it it seems it is a character with many aliases around the world.
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 361

    What might I be doing wrong?
  • Jacob CasalJacob Casal Posts: 82
    I’m not particularly well-versed on this stage of design, but perhaps compare it to the naming data of a similar font to look for errors. Or apply the naming data of your font to another font (temporarily) to see if you can reproduce the error.
  • AbrahamLeeAbrahamLee Posts: 238
    How many family members are there and what are their names?
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 361
    edited May 6
    How many family members are there and what are their names?
    Only one member, that's what puzzles me. It's a single font, in TTF and OTF.
  • AbrahamLeeAbrahamLee Posts: 238
    And did you mark fsSelection as "Regular" even though it's called "Black"?
  • Thomas PhinneyThomas Phinney Posts: 1,504
    Abraham is probably on the right track.

    In a similar vein: your Windows legacy family (Windows name ID 1) needs to be "TDR Black" with style (Windows name ID 2) of "Regular"
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