Comments

  • Nick ShinnNick Shinn Posts: 1,458
    I've always preferred positive type on a white background—the reason being that before you can read a sign you have to locate it, and in a predominantly dark environment (brick and concrete walls, foliage &c.) a white rectangle is more noticeable than a collection of smaller white glyphs.
  • Now if they would only pay you by the sign, James! Like in the olden days with Phototypositor :-)
  • Nick ShinnNick Shinn Posts: 1,458
    Ultimately, neural implants will enable type designers to be micro-paid per glyph viewed. (This idea was prompted by Neal Stephenson’s The Diamond Age.)
  • Mark SimonsonMark Simonson Posts: 1,174
    edited August 2012
    Ted Nelson had pre-web proposal for a similar worldwide network called Xanadu. One of his ideas was that every byte would have a source attribute, so that if you quoted another writer in your work, that writer's id would be embedded, and if you made money from your work, the writer you quoted would get a cut. I can't believe it would ever have worked--too easy to "game"--but it was an interesting idea.

    (Nelson was the guy who came up with the concept of hypertext back in the sixties.)
  • Congratulations, James. It's been a long and winding, um, road.
  • Mark SimonsonMark Simonson Posts: 1,174
    Oh, yeah, that, too. (Sorry for veering off the road. The signs here are in Helvetica.)
  • I've always preferred positive type on a white background—
    Nick, what you describe is referred to as Negative Contrast by traffic engineers. Their terminology drove me crazy for years.
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