Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Mark Simonson

About

Username
Mark Simonson
Joined
Visits
8,464
Last Active
Roles
Member, Type Person
Points
833
Invited by
Admin James Puckett
Posts
774
  • Re: The vinyl records of font formats

    I went to a high end consumer audio show recently, and almost all the exhibitors were demonstrating their equipment using vinyl records as source, not digital. I doubt audiophiles would drop six figures on a second rate sound system.

    Essentially, people who prefer vinyl prefer the way it distorts sound, whether they realize that's what it is or not.

    There are also a lot of psychological and subjective factors at work in the high end audio business. When you pay a high price for something, research shows that you will believe it is better than if you paid a much lower price for the exact same thing. The type market is not immune to this, either.

    We human beings are not as rational as we think we are, but we excel at rationalization.
  • Re: The vinyl records of font formats

    But I thought there was a difference in the maximum UPM for Windows Postscript. That was never a thing?

    1000 UPM was the standard for PostScript Type 1, regardless of platform. Remember, the outline files weren't for on-screen display when the format was developed, but for downloading to laser printers and imagesetters. There was only one PostScript interpreter built into such devices (at least at first). 
  • Re: The vinyl records of font formats

    This smells like a myth.

    As far as I know, Windows PostScript fonts were identical to Mac PostScript fonts, except for the file structure.
  • Re: The vinyl records of font formats

    Also, FWIW, the idea that vinyl records are superior in fidelity to CDs is also a myth. Some people prefer the sound of vinyl, but it's not capable of reproducing sound as accurately as CD.
  • Re: Marking Copies of Fonts

    I had an idea some years ago for discouraging piracy. Basically, claim that the purchaser's credit card number (or some other sensitive data they've given you as part of the purchase) is hidden in the font files, but don't actually do it. On reflection, I decided that it would probably be a good way to get people to stop buying my fonts.