Technical Trivial Facts (.ttf)

image

In 1964 someone found out that it was possible to directly draw on the IBM 2250 Graphics Display Unit with a morsel of removable chalk mounted on the end of a piece of wood, which was secured to a table with a cord to prevent theft.
«13

Comments

  • image

    Sometime in the 1960s, obviously long after Eric Gill depicted her Bézier curves multiple times in all their graceful naturalness, Beatrice Warde demonstrated optimized fonts for smart-phone screens to students. Eventually it took more than 40 years before someone was smart enough to understand what the use of such a clumsy small device was.
  • Ofir ShavitOfir Shavit Posts: 289
    The right one seems to use the much efficient real time multiple hair editing tool, known today as... a comb.
  • image

    It’s a lesser know fact that Doug Engelbart used wood full of larvae of longhorn beetles to reduce the weight of his mouse prototype and especially to add an interesting buzzing techno sound to it. Hence initially he wanted to name the device ‘(tailed) beetle’.
  • image

    In which case we might have been unaware of gravity still, or otherwise might have been using the popular Anvil computer today.
  • Nick ShinnNick Shinn Posts: 1,051
    Beatrice still looks in pretty good shape, better than Eric at that particular date, but what’s on her head? Is it a hat, wig, or some kind of hair-spray confection?
  • The nest-like structure Beatrice is elegantly wearing here, is a so-called Cuckoo Head, which was mighty popular among women in the 1960s. It connected the brain via a garland of highly flexible antenna’s with the Annoyed smart-phone. There was also a matching gadget for a clear bird’s-eye view, named Cuckoo Glass.
  • Chris LozosChris Lozos Posts: 907
    Or as Bob Dylan said, "Your leapord-skin pillbox hat"
  • But that was about a hat; there was too much brain-extending intelligence in the Cuckoo Head to simply call it a Cuckoo Hat.
  • image

    Although there are some persistent rumors that he was physically incapable of developing facial hair, in Redmond they have the strong opinion that he was the first computer nerd who fully understood the technical possibilities of a razor.
  • image

    So-Hot-That-It’s-Melting-Thermal-Paste News: Coming autumn a remarkable book by Clark Cable (‘Gone with the Windows’) titled How Hollywood Influenced the Computer Society will be published!
  • image

    Most people know that C-3Po is largely based on the Metropolis-robot. A less well known fact is that R2-D2 is based on a still from the 1965 spaghetti western With My Bare Butt in a Beer Barrel.

    image
  • image

    Until late in the 1950s at typographic meetings it was common practice –for education and enjoyment– to saw women into two halves to prove that their upper parts were the most important ones for recognition, just as seems to be the case with letters.
  • In Visible Language the Jesuit Priest Walter J. Ong, who was Professor of English literature and of Humanities in Psychiatry (and as such could be considered an outsider), makes a clear distinction between writing and typography by stating that in case of writing words are made by creating marks on surfaces and that with type words are made ‘out of pre-existing things’.*

    image

    Working with pre-existing things doesn’t by definition limit one’s creativity, as was proven by my 10-years old daughter Eleonora A. Blokland aka Noortje earlier today. Using standard LEGO friends® design elements, she created a good likeness of Conchita Wurst, winner of the Eurovision Song Contest 2014; this way not only elevating the toy-building-brick metier to the next level, but en passant also emancipating it.

    * Walter J. Ong, ‘Comment: Voice, Print, and Culture’, Visible Language, Volume IV, Number 1, (1970) pp.77–83 (p.80)
  • image

    After an exhausting expedition of more than six months –and at the brink of giving up– the explorers of the World Typelife Fund (WTF) were utterly relieved to trace the last person on earth who did not claim to be a type designer.
  • image

    Recent in-depth legibility research among primates revealed that eyes and brains are one way or another involved in the recognition of characters.
  • image

    Darn; I definitely want to flag the former post as abuse!
  • image

    Inspired by new approaches from type designers with dyslexia, the footwear industry realized that conventions are flexible, this way opening Pandora's Shoebox.
  • image

    During their ongoing research into present-day applications of archetypal models, the explorers of the World Typelife Fund (WTF) were utterly surprised when they noticed the clear resemblance between the 19th-century representation of a T-RexCiraptor (by paleontologist Edward Drinker Cope) and Beavis (left).


  • A sort of multiple mastering by a certain type of species that can be found commonly worldwide in webs.



  • The serious dyslexia of Waterford Tea & Coffee Van’s operator yielded an unexpected result when he had posted a request for crowdfunding.


  • Early typographic practices for adapting body sizes to grids, inspired others to do related scientific research on Romans, i.e, citizens of Rome.


  • Inspired by the rapidly increasing number of type designers and foundries, and all in the best family tradition, the young Åring Berlin recently composed the musical Annie Get Your Pen.


  • An early prototype of wearable technology with an optical head-mounted display was the Giggle Glitch, which was tested at the Hal Roach Studio during the 1930s. It was a thin plastic lens placed directly on the surface of the eye that communicated with the Internet via eye movements. Tests were terminated because of visual side effects.
  • It exhibits such an amazing concentration of typographic expressiveness, I can't understand how the project could be  abandon for such a trivial reason.
  • Chris LozosChris Lozos Posts: 907
    eye catching


  • During the legendary Typographic Concourse at Birmingham’s Vaudeville's City Centre Theater early October 1956, the elegant Mrs. Bellflower scored 83 points (out of 100) with her depiction of the Roman Imperial capital letter T. Unfortunately the jury deducted some points due to the inappropriate distance between her legs.

Sign In or Register to comment.