Comments

  • Jacob CasalJacob Casal Posts: 91
    Hey! May we know a little more about what you’re going for with this typeface before we give much critique? :)
    It looks to me like some of it’s going for a faux-3D pop-out effect. It reminded me of those tests optometrists use for the patient to point out the graphic that appears to come off the page. Letters like /O,/N,/A,/Q,/@ especially pop out. It could just be my eyes playing a trick on me though. I understand you probably made the counters of the /B and /8 smaller for balance, but maybe open them up just a wee bit more;the same goes for the black counter of the /@. Something is bothering me about that /V, but I can’t quite put my finger on it. Strokes feel too thin? Form is bit too wide maybe? Pulling to the left a little?
    While not wholly a novice anymore I am still inexperienced, so take of my advice what you will. It looks like a pretty fun typeface though.
  • Adam JagoszAdam Jagosz Posts: 350
    edited April 12
    /H looks unapologetically light because of the crossbar. I would rethink the /E — maybe make the top (and bottom) stroke match that of /A /N /O etc. (the “primary” width) and make the crossbar lighter. For /B maybe a triangular structure like for /G?
  • Rob BarbaRob Barba Posts: 40
    Gotta say, I'm loving the negative space asperand (the /@).  I definitely agree with Adam that the /E needs to be tweaked a bit.  The /V does look a tad thin.
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 400
    edited April 12

    Purpose: heavy display.
    /E looks fine to me. lc /e and /i may get some unicase treatment tho.
  • Jacob CasalJacob Casal Posts: 91
    I know I’m a bit late in saying this, but based on how most of your “curved” letters (/B, /C, /J, /O, etc.) have their edges sawed off at an angle perhaps you could try applying that more to the /G as well. On the one hand, its lack of that feature (aside from the counter) makes it pop out more. On the other hand, having one or two angled edges could create a little more harmony with the other “curved” letters. I am a little curious as to how the flags on the /H and /I would affect presentation for words where they don’t fit so snugly (as we see here slightly with the /H next to /G). You already have open spacing with letters like /T, /V, /J, and /Y, but that would really open up a gap if a letter like /T came before an /H or /I.
    On an unrelated note, to Rob’s comment, if one were to name the /@ as an analogue of ampersand ((&)and per se and) I always felt it would make more sense to call it an atpersat or apersat (@ per se at), but looking into it it seems it is a character with many aliases around the world.
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 400

    What might I be doing wrong?
  • Jacob CasalJacob Casal Posts: 91
    I’m not particularly well-versed on this stage of design, but perhaps compare it to the naming data of a similar font to look for errors. Or apply the naming data of your font to another font (temporarily) to see if you can reproduce the error.
  • AbrahamLeeAbrahamLee Posts: 243
    How many family members are there and what are their names?
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 400
    edited May 6
    How many family members are there and what are their names?
    Only one member, that's what puzzles me. It's a single font, in TTF and OTF.
  • AbrahamLeeAbrahamLee Posts: 243
    And did you mark fsSelection as "Regular" even though it's called "Black"?
  • Thomas PhinneyThomas Phinney Posts: 1,561
    Abraham is probably on the right track.

    In a similar vein: your Windows legacy family (Windows name ID 1) needs to be "TDR Black" with style (Windows name ID 2) of "Regular"
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 400
    edited August 7
    Hi again :)
    I read on the issue (I put what Adam wrote in the OpenType panel and fixed an issue about "ascender and descender not adding up to the m-square") and I am happy to say that I was able to export the font to OTF and TTF without FL 5 giving me more warnings. However, there is still a thing about how the OTF version is getting displayed in the Font Viewer on Windows 10:

    I would like to be able to fix whatever is causing this.
  • Thomas PhinneyThomas Phinney Posts: 1,561
    That looks sadly familiar!

    If my guess is right, I have only ever seen this bug once before, and it was about 15-20 years ago.

    Check your Panose number to see if you have accidentally set the font to be monospaced in Panose. Windows cares about this and will enforce it by ignoring your sidebearings in the font! I think it is perhaps the fourth (?) Panose digit, and it had better not be a 9 (?). (If memory serves.)
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 400
    edited August 7
    @Thomas Phinney, you, sir, are a true typographic treasure :) It was indeed the issue that I have set the font as monospaced (because it has a sidebearing of 50 pt for almost all glyphs) and it was indeed the fourth digit of the Panose that was a 9. I unchecked the "Font is monospaced" box and everything went well after that.
  • Thomas PhinneyThomas Phinney Posts: 1,561
    Excellent! Glad to be of help.

    This is not an issue that comes up very often.
  • That looks sadly familiar!

    If my guess is right, I have only ever seen this bug once before, and it was about 15-20 years ago.

    Check your Panose number to see if you have accidentally set the font to be monospaced in Panose. Windows cares about this and will enforce it by ignoring your sidebearings in the font! I think it is perhaps the fourth (?) Panose digit, and it had better not be a 9 (?). (If memory serves.)
    Nothing short of *awesome* here. The nth "tip of the hat" to Thomas…
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 400
    First time for everything. :)

  • Ori Ben-DorOri Ben-Dor Posts: 278

    (First line is written backwards, BTW.)

    3 letters are missing: final mem, final nun & (non-final) pe.

    Top 3 problems:
    – Zayin (ז) is too wide—it looks more like a dalet (ד).
    – Samech (ס) can't have a sharp corner at the bottom-right—that's the main difference between samech and final mem (ם). It could work as a final mem, though (but I'd trim the bottom-left corner lower, to stress the bottom stroke, to distinguish it from a samech).
    – Tav (ת) looks more like a mem (מ), you'll have to drop that slab serif on the right leg.

    Also, some letters look darker than other ones. I don't think you need to read Hebrew to see that, or do you? For example, samech (ס) looks much darker than adjacent ayin (ע). Alef (א) and tet (ט) are also on the dark side.
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 400
    edited August 10
    Thank you for the input, I will work on the things you mentioned.

    @ Hrant H. Papazian
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 400
    аyin (ע)
    Yes, and is this form correct?
  • Ori Ben-DorOri Ben-Dor Posts: 278
    аyin (ע)
    Yes, and is this form correct?
    Yes to what? Which form? Did you mean to attach an image? 
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 400
    аyin (ע)
    Yes, and is this form correct?
    Yes to what? Which form? Did you mean to attach an image? 
    'Yes' in the sense of "I agree with your remarks'. I am not sure if the for of my ayin is as it should be. The model seems to have slightly different proportions :)
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