My second font design

Fede BiagioliFede Biagioli Posts: 2
edited February 1 in Technique and Theory
Hello everyone!

I am designing a new font, and I am with some doubts for the construction of some gliph. Especially with typographical signs such as '&' and '@'.

I'm working, with FL5, and I also have some doubts about how to add weight to the stems, especially in curved and counter-curved shapes (the 's' is the best example of this).

Someone could help me with bibliography, websites, or information to deal with the problems I have in relation to the '&' and the '@'

Finally clarify, that my source is designed for titles and short texts, geometric construction, from the different modules that removed from the 'o'

Thanks you

Comments

  • See the Etymology of Ampersand on Wikipedia.
  • No pictures?
  • Thomas PhinneyThomas Phinney Posts: 920
    edited February 2
    Some things depend on other things. The ideal shape/weighting of the S (and @ and & to some degree) will be at least somewhat different depending on what you have done with other letters.

    Designing Type by Karen Cheng takes a letter-by-letter approach, but it doesn't cover either & or @.
  • See the Etymology of Ampersand on Wikipedia.
    Thanks for your answer! , It will help me see what other morphologies I could use for typography.

    Some things depend on other things. The ideal shape/weighting of the S (and @ and & to some degree) will be at least somewhat different depending on what you have done with other letters.

    Designing Type by Karen Cheng takes a letter-by-letter approach, but it doesn't cover either & or @.
    Naturally, each glyph depends on how other signs were designed and evidently in glyphs like the 's' sometimes "escapes" from the organic form of the rest of the glyphs.

    Thanks for the recommendation of that book, it does not matter that you can not specifically of the characters that I have doubts about. (All help is welcome).

    Follow the advice and come back with some progress!

  • Hrant H. PapazianHrant H. Papazian Posts: 1,041
    edited February 2
    To me the main important thing is to make a character itself, not look too much like a derivation of another. For example making the ampersand an "E"+"t" is rarely a good idea. More subtly, making the inside of the at sign too much like a lowercase "a" is also usually harmful; here's one I've made, contrasted with the letter:

  • Ben BlomBen Blom Posts: 208

    I think different approaches are possible. Here are two examples of fonts I made.

  • Love the left @.
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