Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Best Of

  • Re: Monotype + Mortal Kombat X

    Sub-Zero threatens to decapitate people who balk at signing the new MyFonts contract.
  • Re: Quality; or, What Makes a Font Great?

    If we’re talking about relative newcomers, stressing the need for originality might not be the most helpful or pressing thing. Sure there’s an element of vision, of a fresh take etc, and concepts should be thought about well. OTOH I’ve personally more often seen newcomers way overdo the “THIS HAS A LOT OF SPECIAL CHARACTER” point than under-do it. Certainly when working on text type, it’s much more about reining in the originality and character that pops up anyway, and learning how to make it behave and actually work. ie craft, iteration, learning to see (both micro and macro), etc.
    I also have a hunch that some people have more of an eye for (or interest in) drawing a set of interesting/beautiful shapes, and others (fewer) are better at making it feel coherent and convincing as texture, and it’s when you combine both you potentially get something that’s really good.
  • Re: Which letters to design first to base others off of it?

    Still Kent, one can set a lot Hawaiian with those fonts ya know.

    I understand John's point differently. I tend to think of n, o, p and v as guidelines, but then I design a-z, in order, always returning to the seemingly outlying a at the end. This forces me away from what I see as limitations of copying similarities as they occur, or charts for people who don't think about type design until one of us tells them to. These lead to groupings and their inevitable linking of the letters by black parts, in the example font. Then what? So, I feel like if I go for diversity first, equality of everything black and white comes sooner, if that makes sense. If it doesn't, make sense, think of how many fonts you might abandon after all the effort of a-g, nopv;)
  • Re: Quality; or, What Makes a Font Great?

    What makes a great typeface?
    Plenty of classic faces violate these tenets (sometimes egregiously so), yet have a certain... resonance? flow?
    Soul.
    Clearly, there is more than mechanics going on. I just can’t figure out what it is!
    Great typefaces have powerful souls.
  • Re: Getty Images bought Veer – fonts disappear

    I got several emails about it. Basically, as a font supplier, when the Veer site shuts down, I am released from any contractual obligations with Veer. To make up the loss in income, I may have to see if any of my neighbors need their lawns mowed.
  • Re: Which letters to design first to base others off of it?

    I know a lot of people favour H O n o, and some texts on type design recommend these, but you can't actually create many words or word-like sequence from these letters. That's why I suggest starting with i (which you basically need for the left side of n, in any case), and then making related shapes, so you can quickly start testing highly rhythmic words and word-like sequences: nihilim, hill, onion, million, minion, etc.. I find this much better for judging proportion and spacing than HHHOHOOO and nnnonooo.
  • Re: first use of arrows to indicate directions...

    I wrote something on the subject:
    1) Leonard Digges and Galileo Galilei arrows
    https://synsemia.org/2011/01/04/arrow-as-a-synsemic-perspective/
    2) Pointers (aztec fists, phylacterion...)
    https://synsemia.org/2011/01/05/alternatives-to-the-arrow-and-alternative-functions-of-the-arrow/
    3) Some "maniculae" (fists)
    https://synsemia.org/2010/12/17/633/
    4) Daniele Capo on arrows and vectors
    https://synsemia.org/2011/05/18/frecce-e-vettori-1/
    5) Giovanni Anceschi found an arrow attributed at Sacromonte di Varallo that might have been painted in the first half of XVI century (picture by Riccardo De Franceschi).



  • Re: Curvature Combs

    Agree with Christian re. SpeedPunk. I find it useful for checking / getting a different perspective on a curve (which doesn’t have to be ‘right’, just shows the same thing in a different way and can help to see some things); but I also tend to think of it like training wheels, the goal needs to be not having to use it.
  • Re: Quality; or, What Makes a Font Great?

    Find a direction that is you. Design a type that you would like to see rather than one you have already seen. Then do years of work.
  • Re: Quality; or, What Makes a Font Great?

    Pablo> define soul please :)

    Maybe somewhat off-topic but I've always found great that Christian Schwartz shows early work on his website. Seeing such evolution is much more interesting and inspiring than discussing great first typefaces. Especially when it is hard to tell what attempts were never released.