Type design hot takes

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Comments

  • André G. IsaakAndré G. Isaak Posts: 604
    That comment was at least slightly tongue in cheek :-)
  • Nick ShinnNick Shinn Posts: 1,846
    edited May 3
    It’s likely only problematic for “poly-scriptic” folk such as type designers.
    I always read the KIΛ logo as KILL, which doesn’t dispose me to travelling in one.
    There is a coffee shop nearby with the logo Σuphoria, which I read as… well, you get the picture.
  • Steve GardnerSteve Gardner Posts: 137
    It’s likely only problematic for “poly-scriptic” folk such as type designers.
    I always read the KIΛ logo as KILL, which doesn’t dispose me to travelling in one.
    There is a coffee shop nearby with the logo Σuphoria, which I read as… well, you get the picture.
    Talking of 'imaginative' coffee shop logos, I came across this a couple of years ago in Thessaloniki.


  • John HudsonJohn Hudson Posts: 2,347
    But not in this reproduction John, in which the background is a dull gradient.

    The full page reproductions in the Scholderer book include the background page, and collotype handles it very well. If the background is applied after the fact, then printing it in a spot colour is the best option (I have a nice Soviet lettering book with white backgrounds printed on grey paper: very nice effect).




  • The term “market saturation” is not part of the lexicon of type designers. Or maybe we do need another geometric sans serif, or another informal script, or another . . . ?

  • John SavardJohn Savard Posts: 962
    Too many type designers design type for type designers and not graphic designers


    That may be. But I would identify
    "Not enough type designers design type for graphic designers and not type designers"
    as a problem, if it were the case, whereas the situation you identify, by itself, may mean nothing more than people who design typefaces as a hobby fail to make money at it.
  • Nick ShinnNick Shinn Posts: 1,846
    edited May 5
    maybe we do need another geometric sans serif, or another informal script, or another . . . ?

    Over time, most foundries accumulate representatives of the major genres.
    ’twas ever thus.

    Some are more inclined to book and text work, others to trade and display.
    But sooner or later it seems that we stray from our initial comfort zone, building on the brand.

    I’ve dabbled in as many as I can. So many genres, so little time!
    I’d rather diversify in style than in language support.

    One idea that will never see the light of day (unless some app comes along that makes it instantly feasible): a mirror Shinntype site, with distressed versions of all my designs. But I suspect that such a distressing app would be more likely to be developed as a layout app feature or web site plug-in, rather like Photoshop filters. Which would drive foundry distressing to be more inventive and unique.
  • Russell McGormanRussell McGorman Posts: 238
    edited May 6
    Nowadays designers work too much by numbers. Equal stem widths for example. As if they don't trust their eyes anymore.

    Only because we can be accurate to a bajillionth of a unit, we are. Can't help it. 
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