Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Stuart Sandler

About

Username
Stuart Sandler
Joined
Visits
8,517
Last Active
Roles
Member, Type Person
Points
74
Invited by
Admin James Puckett
Posts
201
  • FULA vs EULA

    One of best comments after my font licensing talk at Typecon was a comment that we as an industry should stop referring to what we do as selling 'fonts' and instead refer to it as selling 'font licenses' made by @Nadine.

    I have noticed more recently after some online research that many organizations (Creative Market, Typekit) have replaced the traditional EULA with basically a large FAQ whereby the actual EULA language is buried elsewhere within the terms of site use or sometimes just not visible at all leaving the FAQ as the controlling agreement.

    It occurred to me that one of the ways we can start to evolved the mindset of licensing vs purchasing fonts is by changing the name of the document itself from End User License Agreement to Font Use License Agreement which could evolved into something between a EULA and an FAQ provided its clear and would be enforceable in a court of law.

    This would represent a change to the public and may make them sit up and take notice of an evolution in the way we approach licensing as both sellers and to buyers.

    I'm curious what you all think of this approach.
  • Re: Broadcast license and TV advertising

    I'm a little late chiming in but I'd pose the question this way . . .

    If you saw your fonts used in the opening of a blockbuster movie that made millions of dollars or saw it on a TV commercial hocking cleanser to millions of viewers throughout the world or if you saw it become the iconic opening credits of a television show via a streaming service, would you feel you're owed any financial compensation for improving somebody elses work product?

    If the answer is yes, then you should absolutely write a broadcast use restriction into your EULA. This is something I've included in my EULAs since the late 1990s and it has generated a significant additional source of income for me and my libraries over the course of time. I've never regretted having Broadcast Use restricted in my EULA but I did regret not having it there.

    Also, any firm who wants your font will always be happy to pay for it, they know these uses aren't free and you'll still get the exposure for the font but you'll also be fairly compensated for the use.
  • Re: MyFonts: Web, Epub, Server etcª license business – worth doing?

    After YEARS of negotiating broadcast, OEM and enterprise licenses, there is no way to create a standardized rate sheet as some clients will run away from the cost and others get a sweet discount.

    Keep in mind when litigating licensing infringements, you can only ask for what you've BEEN PAID on licenses in the past, so there is no such thing as a one-size-fits-all rate sheet.
  • Re: What were the first OpenType font releases? And when?

    I'm almost certain it was a Sparkytype font by David Buck - He was the first indie to figure out all those fancy Adobe OT making tools.
  • Re: TypeSnitch.com

    Not at all Ray . . . We simply went in a different direction and parted company with Mark Fox but the toolset is actually fully working . . .