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John Hudson

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John Hudson
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  • With regard to copyright and international law, if a country is a signatory to the Berne Convention, it has undertaken to provide to foreigners the same protections under copyright as it offers to its own citizens.
  • Look for something in the category of Humanist Sans Serif typefaces. These will tend to have more open apertures, making it easier to distinguish numerals 3 6 8 9 from each other. If budget is a consideration, there are a number of libre (open sourc…
  • I propose a conceptual difference between virtual and synthetic axes (I can't claim to really understand @Belleve Invis dependent axis idea yet, because I'm not strong on the math side and don't know what Lambdas and Let bindings are). I think of a…
  • Hurrah! Congratulations guys.
  • So far, we have ideas around virtual axes, synthetic axes, and now dependent axes. What seems clear is that we need some mechanism by which manipulation of design by axes that affect individual parameters can be mapped to axes that affect the visua…
  • There are two separate things here: 1. Relationship of actual letter heights to the scaled body height. The reason for having (in a Latin script font) the actual ascender height plus descender depth be close to the UPM value of the font is to achie…
  • But it might be faster to just rebuild the anchors in Glyphs directly as it is one of the strong advantages of Glyphs over Volt. I'll tell you if I agree with that after I've tried working with contextual anchors in Glyphs.   
  • The only really clean path between VOLT's .vtp project and .fea code would be scripted, i.e. something that parses the plain text of the .vtp file and converts to .fea syntax. I am not aware of such a script, but have considered commissioning one se…
  • Shahab, I do design typefaces too. I'm not saying it's not important to protect the thing we do. I have seen a couple of times that the exact unique thing one of my typefaces had had been distorted. Oh, I've seen my Gabriola typeface fake bold more…
  • Hrant,Assuming the modified font doesn't get redistributed, the difference between changing the font and changing the image is essentially academic. I don't think so, because of the nature of a font — to paraphrase what I recall you saying on Typo…
  • Shahab, Please help me understand this: If the concern is about the quality, so how about the time that there isn't a modified font and instead the designer did the modifications to the text written by the font (as in a typographic poster)? Are we …
  • I think the assumption that concerns about quality are concerns — or primarily concerns — with reputation are mistaken. It isn't that I think that someone will see a poorly modified font and associate it with me, but that I don't like to see things …
  • I would say the resultant font should be co-owned; neither the original designer nor the modifier can profit from it without the other's consent. That would require an explicit contract between the parties. I'm talking about what is the case under…
  • We're still considering whether or under what conditions to permit modification in our commercial license. What I've done in the past, in some of our no-fee no-commercial-use licenses, e.g. for the SBL fonts, is to include a requirement that any mod…
  • This illustration shows, at the bottom, examples of early German typeset numerals from the 1480s.
  • Given the context of the Uccello project, I presume you mean European numeral forms, not actual Arabic numeral forms? [When we refer to European numbers as 'Arabic', we're referring to the number system, not the shapes. Ironically, the Arabs refer t…
  • Unless a license explicitly prohibits analysing the kerning data, where's the infringement? Collecting and analysing kerning data doesn't even necessarily involve decompiling the font, since it can be collected from text output. Kern values, as impl…
  • I'm bemused by schools using fonts to teach writing models.
  • Ramiro, the same thing is found in some English copy books of the 17th and 18th Century. This is from William Brooks' A Delightful Recreation for the Industrious: a Copy Book of Plain and Practical Writing After the most Modish-manner yet extant wit…
  • [Seeing all this Dutch has produced a sudden craving for double-salt licorice.]
  • It seems to me that using skip-ink for underlining Arabic can potentially create ambiguities in reading. The significant number of descending letters in Arabic mean that some visible underline segments between descenders will be very short and confu…
  • Nick, what's your thinking for the elbow of the roman g sticking out so far to the left?
  • According to the European rules for the use of the IJ in public records, in “ij”, for indicating a stressed syllable, an acute accent is placed on the “i”, not on the “j”. So a stressed “fijn” would look like “fíjn”, and the question would be how to…
  • No, they look the same, but Brill actually make use of the precomposed IJ/ij characters when typesetting Dutch text.
  • Most suited to accompany that roman g? Well, only italic #1 has the same kind of awkwardness.
  • For the record, Brill favour the ligated f+ij in their typography (for which I provide a contextual variant of the /ij glyph, since Brill also favour a single glyph for the ij vowel).
  • With regard to keyboards, yes it is the case that computer keyboards have omitted the IJ/ij letter, obliging Dutch users to type I+J/i+j. However, IJ appeared frequently on typewriter keyboards in the Netherlands e.g. Remington Noiseless Portable