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Nick Shinn

About

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Nick Shinn
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Admin James Puckett
Posts
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Comments

  • It was weird, when I was working on the Greek of my Scotch, that for consistency with the Latin and Cyrillic, I discovered that its “italic” made most sense to be based on what had traditionally been the default style of slanted, cursive type, which…
  • Eras: Armenianization? I like that face a lot, but its slight lean mitigates against it in pixel displays. At the other end of the scale, I gave Figgins Sans a 20 degree inclination (to match Scotch Modern), but that can be problematic when insert…
  • And we haven’t even discussed capitals yet. Of course, “true” italic capitals are exactly the same as the roman, which is how Aldo Manutio and Carl Dair did it! https://www.fontspring.com/fonts/shinntype/dair/dair-67-italic Bruce Rogers, on the ot…
  • Yes, and a mug is the UI between me and my morning coffee.  A plate, however, being flat, is more like a platform for serving food content. This metaphor game is fun! *** My first published typeface (by Face Photosetting, 1976)—thankfully long s…
  • Indeed. Quite apart from letter shape, one interesting development of the didone italic in the mid 19th century was its similar weight and width to the roman. In comparison, the older styles and the transitionals had narrower italics that were ligh…
  • Thanks Florian, I had assumed they were. But had he no say in the matter? (I know he provided input for the old style figures, it was in the short documentary I saw at TypeCon when he was given the SoTA Award.)
  • Adrian Frutiger and Hermann Zapf were required to second guess their original italics for Optima (Nova) and Frutiger (Next), under the (marketing?) premise/pretext of the superiority of “truth”, but it was immediately apparent this was a mistake. Th…
  • I produced Brown (left) and Worldwide (centre) initially for newsprint, optically scaled. The minting sharpens up body type, and provides visual interest at display size. The third style is Beaufort, a glyphic effect which doesn’t require optical sc…
  • Art directors provided type houses with a rough layout of the ad and typed copy (text), marked up for typeface, size, leading, paragraph indent and extra leading, and measure (line length). The headline in the above ad was set from typositor, with …
  • Thanks, I can’t watch talking head docs—I find the twee muzak especially aggrevating.
  • I’ve been using a Wacom tablet and stylus since 1990, specifically to pre-empt carpal issues, which were a big thing (newsworthy) back then; have managed to stave off debilitation, except for a small callous on the end joint of the little finger.
  • From a distant memory, Tempest reminds me of the masthead of The Eagle comic I used to read as a boy in the 1950s.
  • “Upgrading” is much too nice a euphemism for planned obsolesence.
  • There is a lot of “stylistic” choice (curation) involved in constructing such devices, in deciding where to place the sources on a simple two-axis grid, bearing in mind that PANOSE has way more than two dimensions!  Here it is in three dimensions, …
  • I would till vote for her. Although I do wonder whether Papyrus wouldn’t be a better choice for the Green candidate.
  • Optical (faux) kerning. I’m like “Oh dear, the spacing is terrible, I suck”—until I realize my beautiful typeface has been violated. But then I become philosophical and appreciate that they have (hopefully) paid to licence the font, and that I am q…
  • is nonetheless very useful for European scripts—because unlike it doesn’t fail when tracking is applied. So, I have been using it in my recent pseudo-random fonts. It’s supported by InDesign and the like, which is where typographers may vary tra…
  • What you prefer is not what actually happens. It’s not what I “prefer”, it’s the specification in the OpenType Layout Tag Registry! : off by default, may be turned on at the user’s discretion. : on by default, may be turned off at the user‘s d…
  • , and are a quite specific hierarchy of implementation, which should be determined by the font, not over-ridden by the ‘cleverness’ of a layout application.
  • John: I think that's something one needs a certain amount of experience to be able to do if one has something like an intermediate, nominal Regular weight in mind. Certainly, one can start with the Regular. Then derive the Extra Bold from it by v…
  • upon drawing the bold from regular weight You might do better to draw the Extra Bold and Thin (basically a single path, with stroke width applied of 20 units—on a 1000 unit em) first, and interpolate the other weights between. 
  • I’ve never employed this configuration, but I have used something similar (the “disconnected tail”) in a number of typefaces—though not for a lack of space, but because its oddity seemed appropriate for exotic, playful and experimental designs. * E…
  • Well yeah, but it needs a bum-shaped “w” to keep it company.
  • If something can only be acquired by paying for it, people will pay. Discriminating typographers appreciate the subtle differences between typefaces. Ergo, there will always be a market for original typefaces.  Having said that, I must admit that…
  • The character is a real Unicode character, just like letters, punctuation, dingbats and emojis. Changing it violates text, why is this practice even contemplated by layout programmers? 
  • I don’t consider quality as a degree of excellence, but as a distinctive characteristic. For retail typefaces, I always try to create an emergent quality, something new and different, starting with a unique concept and then working it out it as I c…
  • What Mark said. I use in InDesign—very clever and useful, and can even be executed with one hand.
  • But what suprises me more is why are we in this age where empirism is invalid as a method. We have the empiricism of the marketplace: release a font and see if it becomes popular. Clearly, those which succeed are the most readable.
  • Re. Crambideg: as Mark Twain once quipped, never trust a person who only knows one way to spell a word.