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John Savard

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John Savard
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  • Isn't a 1 in oldstyle numerals that looks like a 1 instead of like an I a rather recent innovation?
  • It certainly is possible to write Windows programs that obtain scan codes corresponding to keypresses from the keyboard, rather than requesting input of ASCII characters. Many game programs do so. However, the techniques involved are still consider…
  • Adam Twardoch said: One possible reason for it is that the https://www.microsoft.com/typography/otspec/head.htmdoes not in any way mention CFF.FontMatrix, and the specification for CFF is, well, really weird. It's written from the perspective o…
  • Hrant H. Papazian said: Exactly. So let's stick to common sense: virtually everybody likes to save money; and most people have trouble telling apart TNR and Georgia. Now work from there. The conclusion to be drawn from the situation y…
  • Simon Cozens said: Ben Blom said: Making free fonts, facilitates to kill the market of paid fonts. This statement is empirically testable. What’s the evidence base? Is it? It's not as if we can actually do an experimen…
  • Ben Blom said: Ray Larabie: You can try to hold back the tide but there’ll be a day when nobody buys fonts anymore and it’s not that far off. The future is, to a large degree, shaped by the decisions people take in the present. Suggestin…
  • Khaled Hosny said: The short-term profit of a few, may cause the long-term loss of many. So one should reject good (that is also both legal and moral) business opportunity because someone somewhere thinks it might affect their career choices …
  • On the issue of making the typeface more regular: that, in my opinion, depends on the use to which it is to be put. If it is intended for display or novelty use, or otherwise for simulating the appearance of old documents, imitating the behavior of …
  • Artur Schmal said: Apparently y becomes ij in jointed script and stays y in disconnected script. I think I had seen something earlier in this thread that showed the Dutch ij becoming y in Dutch handwriting. So, although this seems bizarre to …
  • I presume the main motivation for a no-modification clause is that it is perceived as discouraging font piracy. After all, modifying a font involves work, and so people might be tempted not to do that work twice. The obvious argument against a no-m…
  • Yes, viewing your original specimen on 32-bit Windows 7 with Adobe Acrobat Reader XI caused some letters to be cut off either on the right or the top, or both, but only in the Uccello samples on the left, not the Geranium samples on the right.
  • I don't have any suggestions for improving Armenian, but I think that the Latin alphabet should rip off letters from Cyrillic, or otherwise add new ones, so as to have as many as Armenian does - in order to be able to represent the additional conson…
  • I think that Hrant acknowledges that a single acute might not look appropriate to native speakers of Dutch at this time. The way I understand his viewpoint is this: that it would be worthwhile for the Dutch language community to make the effort to …
  • Following your Twitter link, I was amused to see that Russia has already conquered Illinois. On my personal web site, I commented on the fact that, on a visit to the web site of the FMJD, the organization was referred to solely as the World Draught…
  • Artur Schmal said: I feel ij is being turned into a problem, where from a native speaker point of view there is actually not much of a problem. Of course there's a problem. The problem is if you're not a native speaker of Dutch, you're d…
  • Artur Schmal said: Here's some more options. Those options seem... whimsical... to me, and thus to be unlikely to be essentially transparent within the existing reading habits of native speakers of Dutch. Not that there's anything wron…
  • Ben Blom said: John, one of the possible alternatives for a ligature of “f” with a subsequent “ij”, is missing from your examples. It is, in fact, just a “fi” ligature of the unconnected type. Yes, I was only pointing out alternativ…
  • There is yet another possibility: Given that normally the i and j are made into a unit simply by kerning them more tightly than i followed by j as two separate letters, if the issue is that ligating the f together with the leading i makes the f an…
  • Here is an image showing the possible alternatives I can imagine for a ligature of f with a subsequent ij: In addition to the extreme approach of converting ij to a y-umlaut, a fourth choice, using u-umlaut as the basis is shown, based on the ij i…
  • Hrant H. Papazian said: And free to use for any budding rival of IBM... Don't worry, I think co-opting IBM's font identity is the last thing any "budding rival of IBM" that wanted to establish any sort of credibility would want to do. …
  • Hrant H. Papazian said: Gifting third-parties a way to visually mimic/parody/mock you is bad branding. Oh, I agree. That's why I found this an unusual announcement. Which is also partly why I didn't think of the Google font in connection…
  • If the design of the "f" and the "i" in a particular typeface is such that an "fi" ligature is needed, then, given that the design of an "ij" will be similar to that of the individual letters "i" and "j" in that typeface, it's hard for me to see how…
  • When I hear the name Barlow, I always think of Peter Barlow, the inventor of the teleconverter. I'm afraid, although I have heard of John Perry Barlow.
  • André G. Isaak said: Mmmm. Salmiakki (not a Dutch word, I know...) Dubble Zoute Drop is what the Dutch call it... but, yes, no doubt it tastes as sweet by its Finnish name.
  • Hrant H. Papazian said: People can learn to read things as complex as Chinese; Yes, they can. The Chinese writing system is not as complex as is popularly believed by outsiders. A native speaker of Chinese - particularly the Mandarin d…
  • John Hudson said: With regard to keyboards, yes it is the case that computer keyboards have omitted the IJ/ij letter, obliging Dutch users to type I+J/i+j. However, IJ appeared frequently on typewriter keyboards in the Netherlands e.g. Remingto…
  • Ben Blom said: The spelling of Dutch has changed over the years. In the past the “y” has been used, where today the “ij” is being used. In Afrikaans, the “y” is still being used as in the past in Dutch (Dutch: vrijheid; Afrikaans: vryhei…
  • There were two different versions of modified 7-bit ASCII - ISO 646 - for the Netherlands. One had only lower-case ij, and the other had it in both upper-case and lower-case, but neither of those characters in that version occupied the same code poi…
  • Laurenz van Gaalen said: b) 99.999% of the Dutch doesn't use the IJ ligature, probably 0,001%  know it exist. It is just "ij" and "IJ" in real life.  I suspect that more than 0.001% of the Dutch people know that the "ij" ligature exist…
  • Adam Twardoch said: The German name of Kazakhstan is Kasachstan, the Polish name is Kazachstan, the English name is Kazakhstan. I don't think either of those would need to change because the Kazakh spelling of the name changes. Languages that u…