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John Savard

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John Savard
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  • James Montalbano said: @John Savard interesting that you suggest "Cicero, Against Catiline". Not too interesting; the two passages that I suggested had been used a lot. The first one was the original from which the infamous "lorem ipsu…
  • The safest thing to do, of course, would be to use only literature that is in the public domain. Really old literature that is thoroughly free of controversy in its content as well. Oh, say, something like Neque porro quisqam est qui dolorem ipsum…
  • Ofir Shavit said: I have to disagree Ori, the optical issue should not be ignored in Hebrew and in your typeface. If you like to create a contrast in your typeface, you create it, and balance the letter-forms accordingly. You are abso…
  • I'm confused. The video showed the English upper-case alphabet, and one character from the Arabic set. This is not enough for me to really say anything about the typeface. Mostly, it was simply a visual presentation of statements about how wonderfu…
  • This reminds me of the famous quotation: "If there were an individual, readily recognized quality or characteristic which the type designer could incorporate in drawings that would make any one type more beautiful, legible, or distinguished than an…
  • Hrant H. Papazian said: QuoinDesign said: While I can read Cmarbidge, Cgiarbmde doesn't work. This might be because the latter's letter dislocations are too great (throwing off the parallel compilation) but it could instead/also be because…
  • I have seen ligatures in monospaced typestyles used with the older Hammond typewriters that preceded the Vari-Typer. Some of the catalogs in which the styles are illustrated are online. So I know it's been done, strange though it may seem. Here is …
  • Jens Kutilek said: By the way, there isn’t a single superellipse, there is an infinite number of superellipses with parameters between a normal ellipse and a rectangle. Yes, but the one Piet Hein used was the one with the exponent 2 1/2…
  • Of course, the first thing I thought of when I saw that you were doing a typeface based on a shape intermediate between a square and a circle was Melior, designed by Hermann Zapf using the superellipse of Piet Hein.
  • Of course, though, the symbol shown as proposed is different from the one now found in Unicode. The placement of serifs on the bars makes it look like it is turning thumbs down on the currency...
  • James Puckett said: I’m basing this on how Arubans supposedly have ƒ as a currency symbol but use the abbreviation WSG instead. Maybe they just have trouble buying computers with Aruban keyboards, because the market is too small for any …
  • I tried to find some information on this. I found https://www.microsoft.com/typography/developers/fdsspec/monetary.aspx but that just shows that both forms are in use, without supplying any information on whether different countries using the Franc …
  • I was doing a little research. Although it hasn't prevented some imaginative reconstructions, there is no real evidence of the use of Runic writing, or some other system, in Russia prior to Cyrillic and Glagolitic. So there is no equivalent of Bayba…
  • Hrant H. Papazian said: [quoting John Hudson] > It seems kind of insulting to not only ascribe motivations to groups of other people but also motivations of which you clearly disapprove. Anything else would be hypocritical. Consider it a w…
  • I thought it was clear that the rounded /p was older; the Greek uncial from which Cyrillic was derived had a rounded rho, and thus Slavonic ustav and poluustav both had the rounded /r. Which means that there was a time when only the rounded /p exist…
  • I would not wish the Russian people to have suffered after the fall of the Soviet Union as the German people suffered after the fall of the Third Reich. But it is no more admissible for Russians to harbor illusions about the Soviet Union or romantic…
  • Referring to Yeltsin as a "national disaster" for Russia... I cannot agree with this. With Yeltsin, Russia was on the path to regaining the right kind of respect, just as Germany has now obtained respect as a responsible member of the family of nati…
  • As I've noted, I think that due to its tragic history of a long period of Turkish rule, the Greek script still has a serious issue with the integration of its upper and lower case, at least in serif forms. With Cyrillic, I think the basic letter fo…
  • As for some other languages: I have left a comment (which will need to be moderated, as I have just joined to comment) on Typography.Guru to note that it is Poluustav of which Hrant was thinking when he suggests a Russian Er should have a rounded co…
  • Johannes Neumeier said: Your examples bring to mind another fraktur quaint, namely stacked vowels for umlauts, but I dislike that form equally much: I do not disagree with this. I think that particular shape for the capital eszett is f…
  • Here is another illustration of the sort of thing I propose: For the upper case, SS and SZ, as ligatures or even as logograms, like the Dutch IJ. For the lower case, the Antiqua ſs and ſz or ſʒ ligatures, basically the ancestor of the Sulzbach form…
  • It would seem that the best general option would be to make all caps with stacked serifs look somewhat tight, yet not too tight. However, there is one important thing you may have missed: officially (at least at one time in the past) Vietnamese was…
  • Actually, the double long s, if not ſs, which is what I actually wanted to show as a ligature in Fraktur, is or can be a ligature, as can be seen from this illustration of a printer's type case for lower-case Fraktur: on the right-hand side in th…
  • Here is another example: None the less, with respect to this example, as to the other one, you are completely correct. While all three forms of ss (or in one case sz) are present, the only one that is a ligature is the sz-ligature, as present in…
  • Andreas Stötzner said: > historical texts typeset using Fractur typefaces in which just these two forms of the eszett were provided … Would you care to prove that with a sample? I got this from the Wikipedia article on the eszett wh…
  • Andreas Stötzner said: That is not the point. Neither was it the direction of my remark. I certainly will affirm that your post was addressed to the substance of my posts, and was not in any way an out-of-hand reaction to someone not …
  • Andreas Stötzner said: or to guide anyone in the right direction. It does make sense that only the native speakers of German could really see what the right direction is. But I know I have learned a lot from both postings in this threa…
  • John Savard said: In other typefaces, where the eszet is in its usual present-day form, I see now that the proper term for this form is the Sulzbacher form. Oh, yes: here is what I would be tempted to inflict on the German speaking wo…
  • From https://typography.guru/journal/germanys-new-character/ I learned that the need for the capital eszet had become critical since the orthographic reform of 1996 (although perhaps I did so by misunderstanding what I read). But it also noted tha…
  • Nick Shinn said: True, but isn’t the very idea of oldstyle German type an anachronism? Weren’t all historic German types of the XVI–XVIII centuries in the Fraktur style? Yes, the idea of "oldstyle German type" is an anachronism. Howeve…