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John Savard

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John Savard
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  • The illustration in the Wikipedia article on Fraktur - and the typeface used for a German translation of the Kalevala - do show the umlaut as a double acute. So it is common in Fraktur, even if not absolutely universal.
  • From an 1893 ATF specimen book, this sample of Fraktur appears to indicate that the umlaut was composed of marks not dissimilar to the dot (or tittle) on the lower-case i. So the shape was somewhat elongated because other dots were elongated in Fra…
  • While Hungarian has both ő and ű, an a with a similar accent is not used there, and so one would have to be newly drawn. While Hungarians might not recognize the use of ű instead of ü in quotations from German, I would think that the important quest…
  • John Hudson said: Frankly, I don't think the term italic should properly be applied beyond Latin, even to related secondary styles in Cyrillic and Greek, and do so only for convenience and in context of making font families with nominal Italic …
  • Hrant H. Papazian said: BTW, just like cursiveness, Latinization has its place. Just not as a default. My position is that I agree with you that there's no need to Latinize Armenian, but I disagree with the idea that Cyrillic letterforms sh…
  • Hrant H. Papazian said: The best "flavor" suitable for an Italic is simply to mark emphasis, not to appear more informal, organic, fluid, etc. That is a valid point. But it's also true that because people are used to the kind of itali…
  • Hrant H. Papazian said: Ben Blom said: In the serif tradition, italics usually have a cursive construction, and usually differ significantly from the corresponding upright. Let's fix that too. Although slanted Roman is gener…
  • It's also interesting to note that a technique analogous to ink traps, called Optical Proximity Correction, has long been used in integrated circuit fabrication to compensate for the fact that features on chips were no longer many times larger than …
  • While I've noted myself that the usual practice with italic versions of sans-serif typefaces is for them to be slanted versions of the normal version, some of the comments here on this issue have inspired even myself, merely an interested layperson …
  • Ben Blom said: Let’s keep things simple, like this: italic = slanted = oblique (and it doesn’t matter whether italics have a shape more related to fluid writing than to mechanical composition, or not—like it doesn’t matter for uprights). …
  • Ben Blom said: So being noticeable slanted, is a necessary condition for an italic font. Because of this, "upright italic" is a misnomer/oxymoron. Not necessarily (to the second sentence quoted). Since, conventionally, italics are not …
  • Certainly looks like Goudy Old Style to me at first glance. But I thought most advertising was typeset by the ad agency, and was sent to publications in image form, since one might see exactly the same advertisement in LIFE and Popular Mechanics. …
  • I think it is beautiful, although I tend to read the k as lz, more so than the u as a, which I find to be a problem too, but a small one.
  • Basically, in the Latin alphabet, having both uppercase and lowercase was a recent invention - it came about in the Carolingian script, which combined Roman capitals with uncial writing for the lower case. So the lowercase letters had developed inde…
  • Incidentally, in doing a web search, I see that you created the Virtual Composer font which was used in an attempt to establish that the Killian memos were inauthentic. I wasn't able to find out who originally drew Press Roman for IBM.
  • Thank you for this interesting historical information. I searched for historical information on Van Krimpen's objections, and I see that it was his preference to design directly for the unit system, even though the usual practice at Monotype was fo…
  • Clearly I'm no professional type designer. The only thing I could see (apparently) wrong with the typeface sample that began this thread was that the capital Y should have had a shallower V-part and a longer stem. The width of the letter U completel…
  • I don't see anything in there about a change in the price of the font licenses. I'll grant you that an increase in convenience will make some difference. But compared to a) Google Fonts, and b) all those Bitstream look-alikes to the most popular …
  • James Montalbano said: @John Savard interesting that you suggest "Cicero, Against Catiline". Not too interesting; the two passages that I suggested had been used a lot. The first one was the original from which the infamous "lorem ipsu…
  • The safest thing to do, of course, would be to use only literature that is in the public domain. Really old literature that is thoroughly free of controversy in its content as well. Oh, say, something like Neque porro quisqam est qui dolorem ipsum…
  • Ofir Shavit said: I have to disagree Ori, the optical issue should not be ignored in Hebrew and in your typeface. If you like to create a contrast in your typeface, you create it, and balance the letter-forms accordingly. You are abso…
  • I'm confused. The video showed the English upper-case alphabet, and one character from the Arabic set. This is not enough for me to really say anything about the typeface. Mostly, it was simply a visual presentation of statements about how wonderfu…
  • This reminds me of the famous quotation: "If there were an individual, readily recognized quality or characteristic which the type designer could incorporate in drawings that would make any one type more beautiful, legible, or distinguished than an…
  • Hrant H. Papazian said: QuoinDesign said: While I can read Cmarbidge, Cgiarbmde doesn't work. This might be because the latter's letter dislocations are too great (throwing off the parallel compilation) but it could instead/also be because…
  • I have seen ligatures in monospaced typestyles used with the older Hammond typewriters that preceded the Vari-Typer. Some of the catalogs in which the styles are illustrated are online. So I know it's been done, strange though it may seem. Here is …
  • Jens Kutilek said: By the way, there isn’t a single superellipse, there is an infinite number of superellipses with parameters between a normal ellipse and a rectangle. Yes, but the one Piet Hein used was the one with the exponent 2 1/2…
  • Of course, the first thing I thought of when I saw that you were doing a typeface based on a shape intermediate between a square and a circle was Melior, designed by Hermann Zapf using the superellipse of Piet Hein.
  • Of course, though, the symbol shown as proposed is different from the one now found in Unicode. The placement of serifs on the bars makes it look like it is turning thumbs down on the currency...
  • James Puckett said: I’m basing this on how Arubans supposedly have ƒ as a currency symbol but use the abbreviation WSG instead. Maybe they just have trouble buying computers with Aruban keyboards, because the market is too small for any …
  • I tried to find some information on this. I found https://www.microsoft.com/typography/developers/fdsspec/monetary.aspx but that just shows that both forms are in use, without supplying any information on whether different countries using the Franc …