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Ben Blom

About

Username
Ben Blom
Joined
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132
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Member
Points
95
Posts
230
Real Name
Ben Blom
Company
Durotype
Location
Best, Netherlands
Web Site
http://www.durotype.com

Comments

  • My approach to round terminals which are supposed to look like circular rounded terminals, is to make them just a little more blunt than a circle. The black contour in the terminal on the right side of the image below, is a semicircle; while the …
  • My naming conventions for rounded fonts, are discussed in this attached PDF quote from my Flexo Soft specimen manual:
  • Linus, thank you for the changes in your program. Something seems to be wrong with your last user interface example: “Step number A” has value 6, and “least step number” has value 2. I would expect these values to be the same. The image you t…
  • With the generalized function, we can now interpolate three points A, B and C Interesting indeed. Being able to calculate interpolation values for three points, instead of two, is a valuable addition, in case one doesn’t want to use a De Gro…
  • Daniel Veneklaas: I often find when coming back to something I worked on for a while with fresh eyes, new issues arise and issues I thought I resolved are still there. This is a characteristic of many creative endeavors, and is usually consi…
  • Then why have the separate terms other than to cause confusion? My wording was not careful. The terms are not synonyms. The point is, that people may disagree about which of those two terms to use. What someone considers to be a general des…
  • This imprecise use suggests that in many contexts, the difference between a single item and a family of items, is irrelevant. It only suggests that what was once historically precise, is now open for interpretation. Imprecise use is not…
  • James Montalbano: Everything about type design is fun. If you don’t feel that way perhaps you need to find another line of work. This seems to be a case of someone shooting the breeze. For instance, it’s no fun to have to check 60,000 glyp…
  • John Hudson: I really don’t see a reason to have a word that means both an individual typeface and a typeface family. I agree that using these two meanings interchangeably, can be a source of confusion. So, as far as possible, it is better t…
  • Font – a physical representation of the typeface (Helvetica.otf) A font file like “Helvetica.otf” can be used to create a physical representation of a design, but is not a bunch of physical letters (etc.) itself.
  • John, just after I edited my last post—by adding “one weird exception”—I saw your post appear. There may be more exceptions than that “weird exception”—so indeed, in practice, not all members of a font family may be variations of the same general…
  • I’m afraid there will never be consensus about this. I agree with Chris Lozos. For me, a typeface (= font family) is a family of fonts (= family of styles). A font is a single style. A style is a specific weight, width, slant, etc. On a comp…
  • (Off topic:) André, can you please refrain from repeating “André” at the end of each post? Your name is already at the beginning of your posts. It’s a waste of space. It is not customary practice here.
  • Thomas Phinney: The entire point of the numbers is to generate something that “looks right.” Which numbers are “correct” is dependent on perception. Of course, in the end, the choice of a weight progression logic is based on perception (and …
  • Thomas Phinney: The whole notion of a weight curve is perception-based in the first place. Thomas, here you confirm that you misunderstood me. I discussed a weight progression like a linear progression or a “De Groot” progression—which is ab…
  • Thomas, perhaps I misunderstood you when suggesting that your reasoning is based on a misunderstanding. However, it seems again that you misunderstood what I wrote before. Thomas Phinney: as there is quite a bit of disagreement about what th…
  • Thomas Phinney: I am quite sure I believe that the design of a font is relevant for the choice of its weight progression logic.  To support this, you say: Thomas Phinney: In particular, the “weight progression” is being defined solely i…
  • Jasper de Waard: I am interested in the cause of this bias. Why would our visual system be set up in such a way that the A’s left line appears thicker than its right line (if they are metrically equal)? This Why-question is asking for a kind…
  • Abraham Lee: Ultimately, trust your eyes. They are the best judge of a good progression of weights. Well... yes and no. Only use your eyes when u are deciding which weight progression logic to choose. Once you have decided which logic or sys…
  • Just out of curiosity if you don't mind me asking, how much of Aspira was drawn from scratch and how much was interpolated? See here.
  • See here for the reason why I use a UPM of 3333.
  • Below is a table of the uprights of my Aspira family. The width of left stem of the “m” in the sixth row (Bold) is, from left to right (UPM = 3333): 402, 412, 422, 432, 442, 452, 463.
  • Joe, I don’t have an opinion about the substance of what you suggest in your post—but I really dislike the tone of it. Someone who doesn’t answer an email within a day, is not some kind of dictator. If I would receive an email with the same tone …
  • The font-related questions are without any depth. The question about Gill’s private life is more like a tabloid story. These are not questions for a serious dissertation. I think the one who made this up, is trying to make fun. Spam!
  • I think different approaches are possible. Here are two examples of fonts I made.
  • The question suggests there are two sets of diacritics, one for lowercase and one for uppercase. When one includes small caps in a font, I think one should use a third set of diacritics for small caps. So, in a font that contains small caps,…
  • Chris, I’m afraid you are just wrong. In Illustrator, the sorting order of fonts is exactly the same as in InDesign.
  • Chris Lozos: Then you have the Ai problem of sorting fonts in an order only known to Socrates! The sorting of Aspira in InDesign looks like this:
  • This is the naming system for widths and weights that I use in my Aspira typeface:
  • “Like” has been awarded a lot to posts which are supposed to be funny, but don’t help the discussion very much. I think there can be enough fun between the lines of serious posts. No need for “funny posts”, and the “Like” flag which rewards such…