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Kent Lew

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Kent Lew
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Comments

  • This seems big. Opens up an avenue for more demand.
  • Moxie comes from the trade name of an American soft drink popular in the late 1800s, early 1900s. It was flavored with bitter herbs that were purported to strengthen one’s nerves. In popular slang, having Moxie came to mean “having strong nerves, co…
    in Moxic Comment by Kent Lew April 10
  • Thanks for finding that reference, George. I quickly perused my Unicode 8 document and didn’t find it this morning. But now I see what you quoted, in Chapter 7.1. As I suspected.
  • Nope. It’s not “the font” responding when you type something. It’s an app, and it is using either its own or system-level services for Unicode support. Okay, fair enough. As the app is processing the Unicode via its own or system-level services…
  • Ah, I took Nick to mean the second case (GPOS). I wondered if that might be so in several of the responses here. That seems like a very cumbersome approach to me. First of all, it’s very unlikely that any user (or keyboard) is inputting u+0131 pl…
  • In the discussion of “make the /i character as a composite from dotless i and dot accent” I think perhaps we need to distinguish between a) making the /i glyph from components of /dotlessi and /dotaccentcmb, and b) generating an /i character on…
  • Wait, you mean I might be able to actually contemplating updating my system now?! What will that mean for my hard-earned reputation of always being several versions behind? ;-) But seriously, thank you Font Lab!
  • Sounds like a valuable venture, Matthew. Thanks for announcing here. Best of luck!
  • If it’s not something that would go away “with anything a user would do”, but it’s also “not a font-related problem” — then, I’m not sure what you’re hoping for.
  • That top one threatens to read as an L. Or possibly Z in certain contexts.
  • Cooper Fullface was later renamed Cooper Modern when picked up by ATF and a new 'f' was designed, due to criticism of the original shown in Nick’s scan. When I get a spare moment I can make a scan from the Book of Oz, if you’re curious.
  • And yet you see with later examples, not in the Garalde vein, such as Fournier/Barbou, which had been identified as a primary source of inspiration for this effort, such a stress pattern is not really the case at all.
  • Given that the dot accent outline is being referenced as a component, I don’t understand how its advance width would come into play during rendering. But it does seem that this could be the source of the bug. FWIW, I’ve only seen examples with the z…
  • @Nick Shinn What’s the buggy behavior that you’re experiencing, and with what version[s] of Word? I know DJR has built his /i’s from composites in at least a few fonts, and I’ve never heard him report feedback about Word bugginess. I don’t know i…
  • I, for one, still use CS6 apps and do not have a CC subscription. FWIW.
  • The heel of b is a distinctly Fournier characteristic. It never really caught on with his contemporaries. The wide-ish g is found in Monotype’s Fournier and Barbou, but was not necessarily always the case across Fournier’s œuvre. To make it work be…
  • I disagree with Thomas about the “too steepness” of the newer accents. I think they look very French, very Garamond, FWIW. I like them. I don’t think there’d be confusion between acute & grave. (But, then again, my native tongue does not regular…
  • Can’t you just use a .pth file as a redirect? It’s been a while since I did this, so someone else will correct me if I’m wrong. Create a text file and name it “fontTools.pth”. The contents will be simply the path to your installation, just as you h…
  • The fallback behavior that John describes is actually a generic fallback in the World-Ready Composer, not applicable just to Hebrew. If any base character is followed by a combining mark, then one of three things may happen: 1) If the combination …
  • Or the editors I worked with were misinformed. To be fair to them (and you), the Chicago Manual of Style is certainly not gospel. Many editors choose to follow different style guides. There are plenty of others out there.
  • suspect there may also be differences between regional preferences, e.g. between Portugal and Brazil. I have wondered as much myself. Igor might have insight. If the different preferences are strong enough, distinct, and consistent, then presumabl…
  • Contrary to what Mark learned, the scheme advocated by The Chicago Manual of Style (15th Edition, 2003, anyway; not sure if they changed in the 17th) is that “all punctuation marks should appear in the same font — roman or italic — as the main or su…
  • As I understand it, in those languages that most utilize the ordfeminine and ordmasculine, an underscore may be desirable. (I’ve certainly heard this from Portuguese typographers.) Also, the vertical alignment of these ordinals may be different tha…
  • Italic in the same font as Roman is a conceptual component of the variable font format. David Jonathan Ross recently explored this in an interesting way: https://djr.com/notes/roslindale-variable-italic-font-of-the-month/
  • It’s also possible that the font(s) in question were customized for the client even if they are based on commercial fonts, and renamed with the client name by the designer for versioning purposes.
  • That difference in hinting of the “middle bar” is worth paying attention to. The slight curvature to that element will get lost at smaller sizes and lower resolutions. When it does, the FF hinting will tend to render it slightly heavier than the …
  • Manual. Punch cutters were certainly capable of amazing precision and craftsmanship. I’m just not sure how much experience Binny would have when he and Ronaldson decided to start their foundry. Also, the metal they had to work with may have been les…
  • The relationship you are concerned with is essentially the units per em. The “em” is the virtual distance from the top (the defined “ascender”) to the bottom (the defined “descender”). When the font is rendered, that virtual distance is scaled to…
  • Adam — Keep in mind that when CH Griffith designed Monticello for Linotype in the mid 20th century, he was explicitly trying to recreate the idiosyncrasies and capture the historical charm of Binny & Ronaldson’s Pica Roman No. 1 from ca. 1796 (l…
  • You can’t blend oil and water, you simply can’t. And yet, salad dressing does this every day. It’s technically an emulsion, and it isn’t infinitely stable. But it can be done to some degree. Shake well before serving. ;-)