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Kent Lew

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Kent Lew
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  • Simon Cozens said: How many "kern pairs" did some of the most famous letterpress types have? Practically none. I’ll refer you back to this conversation.
  • I have no idea why some would be right-reading. There doesn’t seem to be a pattern among what you’ve posted (an admittedly small sample). But, for instance, the Electra italic is reverse, as I would have expected.
  • One thing that some folks here might be interested to note: the British L&M (Linotype & Machinery) drawings are likely to vary subtly from corresponding drawings by the American MLCo (Mergenthaler Linotype Co.) of the same face & size. …
  • Christian — I’m not really qualified to say. But, from the capital selection I’d lean toward the second or fourth. Not sure what that means for the lowercase. Again, we should hope for a native speaker to weigh in.
  • I’ll be curious to hear what native users think of Cyrillic Лл. To my eye, they are not terribly convincing. Дд perhaps only slightly more so. I think capital Ъ probably needs to be one column wider. But again, a native user would have to confirm. …
  • P.S. All that rounding and softening in the samples you mentioned are later exaggerations of wear-and-tear associated with a romantic notion of the earlier period. Type makers from the 1800s weren’t trying to make their type rounded; they wanted it …
  • Try getting in touch with David Shields. He has spent a lot of time with material from the era you’re interested in, and he might have some ideas of where to look for exemplars. You might also be able to find something of interest by perusing the o…
  • Very well. I have not kept up with those latest discussions. But if you’re going to reduce lineGap to 0 and redistribute the advance into the asc/desc fields, then it seems to me you might as well make them equal with the win values, since they are…
    in Units per em Comment by Kent Lew July 27
  • Hmm. Now that looks unorthodox. In that scheme, I don’t see any reason to have hheaAsc/Desc values differ from winAsc/Desc values. And I believe you definitely want absolute values of typoAsc/Desc to sum to the UPM, with extra line advance put into…
    in Units per em Comment by Kent Lew July 27
  • I assume that the winAscent = 975 is because you have Vietnamese glyphs, or some other extreme glyphs, that require lots of head room to prevent clipping. But because this is disproportionate — i.e., not matched by similar extra “leg” room — I don’…
    in Units per em Comment by Kent Lew July 27
  • P.S. Especially for a rather modest reduction, like I believe you’re considering. It might be different if ascenders/descenders were being lengthened considerably and would then extend beyond the existing info values — mostly with regard to clippin…
    in Units per em Comment by Kent Lew July 26
  • To support a {rand} feature in a page layout app, something more than just the font and text engine would be required. A routine needs to be included to generate random numbers, then use that result to make a selection from the one-from-many GSUB ta…
  • Usually the ascender/descender values add up to the UPM. But that doesn’t mean that the ascenders and descenders of the design need to extend exactly to those bounds. But which ascender/descender values are you specifically referring to? There are…
    in Units per em Comment by Kent Lew July 26
  • Be sure to clear your Adobe font caches between experiments with font info changes. Adobe apps tend to retain “memory” in the menu.
  • RMX Scaler requires a font file to be set up as a MM in order to do its thing. So, it presupposes at least two weights already.
  • That’s just an artifact of Google-book digitization and that particular scaled rendering. I wouldn’t read anything to definite into it.
  • * historical, scholarly, biblical transliteration and such. Note that not all of the white glyphs in Ray’s image fall in these categories (depending upon how you define “and such” ;-). Some are required for additional, “living,” “minority” languag…
  • But if we see a book printed with this kind of 'tilde' today it will be really strange for us as readers, it would look like a mistake. I’m sorry to hear that. I really like that kind of tilde! ;-)
  • I noticed that in Spanish (my mother tongue) we are used to the 'acute' being more horizontal, it goes well with the 'tilde' and hides better in paragraphs. That may well be true today, but it wasn’t always the case. Historically, for examp…
  • Katy — To my eye, it looks a little cramped internally, it appears shorter than the other caps, and the left sidebearing seems too wide. [You could also try reaching out to Carl Crossgrove (designer of Mundo Sans) to see if he has any opinions on t…
  • and that these characters were never part of the Mac OS Roman encoding So much for my recollection. I’ll blame advancing age. ;-)
  • Yeah, right, I suppose Windows 1252 had these also. From the same era. (Sorry, a little Mac centric.)
  • I do currently work as a jack-of-all-typographic-trades — typographer, type designer, font engineer, et al. I just don’t support myself entirely from any one of those. I have been a free lance for decades. Over time, as my interests and experience …
  • Superscript ¹²³-only is a legacy from MacRoman Postscript Type 1 encoding. Older fonts from that period will tend to have only those three. (Sometimes you find a superscript 4, because one drew it anyway to compose the legacy three pre-built fractio…
  • As an aside, I do actually still work as a typographer on occasion. P.S. But, in response to the title of this thread, I can’t make a living at it full-time. ;-)
  • Mark Simonson said: First, just to clarify the terminology: A typographer is someone who specializes in working with type, not someone who designs typefaces. It used to be an actual job position in publishing houses and advertising agenci…
  • “Doesn’t work” = not supported yet. For example, in InDesign there is no default language option for Serbian (or Macedonian). You can only add it by jumping through a number of hoops: https://blog.typekit.com/2011/11/04/how-to-enable-more-language…
  • Yeah, I was thinking about that . . . (but г is very different phoneme from ι, of course. ;-)
  • Nikola Kostic said: but for Serbian italic forms, with the particular style that you've chosen (in your original post) I think that the curved terminal for the italic г would feel more natural. Nikola — Thanks for your input. I had won…
  • I am glad to have sparked conversation between native Cyrillic users. This becomes more and more valuable. :-) Stefan Peev said: how does the Macedonian ghe glyph ought to look like in a Sans Italic with no stroke contrast. You could see …