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Kent Lew

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Kent Lew
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  • Even foundry faces appear to have been designed to a unit of 1/4 of a point by some foundries; which makes sense, as without some commonality, how could lines be justified exactly? Linotype matrices were specified to .001" increments (with machinin…
  • Michel is not wrong about the consideration for moving kerning data. But a script can deal with renaming in groups and kerning data pretty readily, if one just accounts for it. Still, if the objective is to work in Word (and only in one’s own close…
  • Yes, as one can see in Ray’s example, the Latin Extended Additional range is not well-supported in Lucida Sans Unicode, unfortunately. (At least, not in the version 5.0 that I have on my Mac; nor the one that Ray has, it seems.)
  • Or you can use some kind of CSS skinning plug-in to specify your own local font-family. Why not. Personally, I don’t mind the Lucida Grande fallback. But that’s on Mac. Those Windows/Edge Times Roman and Windows/Chrome decomposed Lucida Sans Unicod…
  • I think most webfonts would work perfectly well for screen with a low UPM like 256. I think most (if not all) of Font Bureau’s RE fonts are on 512 upem, using similar reasoning. I believe that this approach grew out of David Berlow’s experience cre…
  • the best solution is to ask the client, and let them decide. For me, it would be a nightmare if I had to change the font in any of the old documents that I opened because the font's name had changed. When working with clients on this sort of mo…
  • In Slovak, that is not an apostrophe! (Despite how it may perhaps be input sometimes in some “dumb” environments.) It is an accented letter: Ľ. So, yes, it is thought of as part of a single letter.
  • I've checked some fonts, and haven't found one that compensates for differences in the curvature radius by playing with the height. FWIW, I have on occasion placed the overshoot of an eight or a zero differently than the general overshoot value, …
    in 656565656 Comment by Kent Lew March 11
  • Scribus actually just draws some predefined shapes for the few “invisible” characters it supports. InDesign also has its own predefined symbols for displaying invisible characters when Show Hidden Characters is activated, independent of what might …
  • Nina — As I said, I only double-encode U+00AD in case there is a validation tool that needs the codepoint in order to permit indication of certain codepage coverages. I suspect, as John does, that it doesn’t actually matter what’s in the font or not.
  • That may be to indicate that single quotes are used as the second level of quotation? Dunno. Sort of. Those single quote marks are indications of what InDesign thinks it should do with a single typewriter quote to become a “typographic quote” in th…
  • I've not checked to see whether it might be accessible from some deep level of the Greek keyboard layout. Shift-Option-Q (―) on Mac Greek keyboard. But I don’t actually see it on the Mac Greek Polytonic keyboard (unless it’s the function of som…
  • Or @Nina Stössinger’s Selavy? I believe that was also the approach that David Jonathan Ross took to constructing his early Variable Font experiment: Lab DJR.
  • There was a Cyrus Highsmith design that I worked on a few years back where he had drawn mirrored quotes. Matthew Carter relayed his cautionary tail against having that form as a default. So, I attempted to work out a scheme to manage between mirro…
  • Further to what @Khaled Hosny said about U+00AD being a control character, in the Unicode Standard, you will find this description in the chapter on punctuation: Soft Hyphen. Despite its name, U+00AD soft hyphen is not a hyphen, but rather an invis…
  • My preferred approach to U+00AD softhyphen is the same as U+00A0 nbspace — which is to say, I prefer to double-encode them with their default references hyphen and space. These two are unique characters whose distinct properties I feel should be pr…
  • I tend to use composites extensively for quotes, since it allows me to adjust all rather simultaneously, which I find tremendously useful when balancing opening & closing pairs. Adjusting fitting is trickier, depending upon the environment I happe…
  • Christian — I believe most English style guides would advise similarly. It should be punctuated in the same manner as would the translated phrase it abbreviates: “for example.”
  • how can you get the same spacing between the l and the apostrophe  without checking if the vowel following the apostrophe is accented or not? By having the spacing between the l and apostrophe in the second line as the default in all cases. (An…
  • To get the best of both lines requires a contextual lookup. Why would that be the case? Only if one is relying upon the substitution of a separate glyph to get the extra space in « L’être » and « l’âge ». But, as I argued above, judicious kerning …
  • Hmm. Since those are essentially the old Type 1 values, I always sum the ascender + |descender| to the UPM, just like we used to do. I assume the Caps height and x height values get compiled to the OS/2 sCapHeight and sxHeight fields. But the ascen…
  • Michel — When you replaced your image with a changed version, you put the first two paragraphs of my subsequent comment into a false context. :-( For the record, I no longer care so much for the English in the second example. I feel that such diff…
  • Michel — You say that in your second examples “vowels get more spacing,” but in fact it appears to me that the d and c have come along for the ride with the class as well. I, too, prefer your second set. For both English and French — except that I’…
  • Michel — What you point out is a general caution to be considered when creating class kerning. It is easy to be overzealous with classes. There are various arguments for different philosophies of lumping or splitting. But I do not think the issue …
  • Well, now, that would be more a matter of copy-editing, not proof-reading for typos. (I don’t think there’s any value in getting into the age-old debate about the serial comma here.)
  • Thinking about this more, and for the sake of argument, let’s assume that a localized, more widely fitted quoteright, à la Arno, is in fact a desirable solution to these issues (and not just an overcompensation for angry complaints about past bad de…
  • Thomas — I do realize that the matter of French elision involves much more than just d’ and l’. The main thrust of my argument above was that I don’t think that fitting for French needs to be at odds with fitting for English (or any other language…
  • Bhikku — It is entirely likely that Brano’s tool is indeed targeted to operate on Rusyn, a Slavic language, given that the other stated targets include Slovak and Czech.
  • Yassin, Thomas, and Michel — Thank you for your perspectives. Not all English-speaking type designers kern only with English in mind, btw. ;-) Being mindful that there are frequent combinations in French that need to be considered from a French pe…
  • No, Stephen, there is no localization for other French punctuation. But I don’t want to stray from my specific question about the apostrophe and into a discussion of French punctuation in general. Not yet, anyway. Hrant, thanks for sharing JBM’s co…