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Cory Maylett

About

Username
Cory Maylett
Joined
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75
Last Active
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Member
Points
90
Posts
63
Location
Salt Lake City, Utah USA
Web Site
http://maylett.net
LinkedIn
http://linkedin.com/in/maylett

Comments

  • I'm not sure I see much more in those names than them being whatever struck the fancy of the person naming them — that combined with an attempt at being somewhat descriptive. Soft, to me, seems to imply rounded corners, while round might suggest a …
  • Ebern Klause said: It seems to me that it is simple logic that all table figures in a family align with each other across weights and styles... That seems a logical argument to make with bold and regular weights (and matching italics), b…
  • But isn't that the case, Nick, with copyright protections in general on most things? It still doesn't stop copyright protection from being useful, though. Even if fonts were still copyrightable (or even better, type designs were copyrightable), mos…
  • These kinds of things are more about art, aesthetics and intuition than they are about finding rules and formulas to follow.
  • I agree that monospaced fonts used for coding benefit from more prominent punctuation marks since these characters play more than the supporting roles they do in normal text. No coder wants to accidentally confuse a period with a comma due to it not…
  • JoyceKetterer said: @Cory Maylett :  First, violating a contract is not quite the same as breaking the law, so how about not throwing around the word "illegal" haphazardly? I can work with license violators.  I can't work with people who refu…
  • @JoyceKetter — There's not a whole lot of passive income coming in from millions of copies of illegally used fonts either. I think we'll just need to disagree on this one.
  • @JoyceKetterer — When large companies commission their own fonts to avoid licensing issues, I see as much opportunity there as I do drawbacks.  One clear advantage to this kind of publicity is the public realizing that the common practice of copyi…
  • JoyceKetterer said: I've seen the articles about avoiding licensing costs.  I think it's clear we as an industry are accumulating bad PR.  Ug I would argue that it's good PR. These articles and cases help get the word out that it's ill…
  • Jens Kutilek said: For webfonts, families are formed at the CSS Level in the font-face rules. It doesn’t matter how the internal font names are set up. Since it's a bit unusual, I'm unsure how having a large family containing multiple fo…
  • Dave Crossland said: ...separate families is not only easier to sell and market, but required for web fonts usage. Well, that pretty much clinches it. Thank you, Dave. This makes me feel a bit silly since my day job involves designing and …
  • Thanks for the feedback. This is exactly what I was asking about. John Hudson, yes, I'm mostly talking about how best to package this large family in order to market it. Although, I'm constantly surprising myself with what I don't know regarding…
  • I'd probably make the bottom right corner of the C round instead of square. A square corner makes it look a bit like a G waiting to happen. Come to think of it, I might do the same with the E too. If you do stick with the square corners on those two…
  • It depends on the typeface, but I've had good luck creating lights and x-bolds, then interpolating a regular from them, which I'll tweak as needed before interpolating other in-between weights. Hairlines and ultras/blacks often require too many desi…
  • The first font I ever designed — a Type 1 font released as shareware back in 1991 — began showing up with Dieter Steffmann's name on it a few years later. As far as I could tell, he didn't even bother to make any changes to the glyph outlines or ker…
  • Sorry, Andreas, but I reserve the right to respond politely in whatever way I choose.
  • I'm just a bit skeptical about single-story a's and g's making reading easier for children. When learning to read, children learn the difference between caps and lower case, they learn to recognize what punctuation marks are for and, hardest of al…
  • Roel Nieskens said: If version X of your site can do without non-essential stuff, why serve it for version Y? There are lots of different reasons. For example, an average user on a mobile phone visiting a page with lots of informatio…
  • Roel Nieskens said: I think the difference with responsive layout and webfonts is that a layout is made malleable to fit any sort of screen, and you let each device sort out which layout it needs to draw. As a developer you create the layout an…
  • Johannes Neumeier said: I agree with Roel on the difficulty of finding a sensible metric for deciding when to serve web fonts. There's currently no infallible method to optimize downloadable content — including web fonts — for the devic…
  • From my perspective, the most stylish and interesting glyph in the bunch is the s. If it were me, I'd probably spend less time perfecting that letter and more time figuring out ways to incorporate aspects of its personality into the others.
  • Beau Williamson said: Type is printed at 1200 dpi in professional settings. The best phones are under 600 dpi for now. Even an office xerox will do black text at 600 dpi. The phone will be better than your home printer. High-end vector …
  • Yeah, but that's largely true of delivering most responsive content. You aim for a sweet spot somewhere in the middle that's targeted at most users while making it easy for those on either side of the bell curve to adapt to what's being served. I t…
  • @Roul Nieskens Sorry, my bad. I misunderstood your question. I doubt there's currently a surefire way to handle the problem. This might be an issue mostly confined to the group of developers I work with, but they're using variations of what's fo…
  • Roel Nieskens said: How do you determine when to drop fonts for mobile? I suppose the main reason for pulling in additional fonts is to help create a unique personality for the site. There might be one typeface that's critical for main…
  • jeremy tribby said: it's been my experience that it's hard to sell dev teams on responsive type because it's a bunch of network requests with a considerable payload size. I'm not sure I totally agree. With network speeds getting increasi…
  • I read through the entire thread before running into the last three posts from Nick and Thomas that say what I've thought for some time now. As a graphic designer myself, I work with, hire and have lots of friends who are also graphic designers.…
  • There's also the practical matter of consumer preference. Whether through habit, ignorance or actual necessity, some people just prefer TrueType fonts. So if you're aiming for widespread usage or maximized sales, ignoring TrueType might very well li…
  • Previous major advances in printing/typography were impossible to predict before the underlying principles and technologies that made them possible were discovered or invented. For example, head back several decades and the whole notion of digital a…
  • I was the design director at a daily newspaper for several years, so I'm somewhat familiar with the issue. The choice of a newspaper typeface involves aesthetics, personality, legibility and all those other considerations that, really, apply to mos…