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Cory Maylett

About

Username
Cory Maylett
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447
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Member
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179
Posts
132
Location
Salt Lake City, Utah USA
Web Site
http://maylett.net
LinkedIn
http://linkedin.com/in/maylett

Comments

  • I miss the tools and all the processes involved. But all the little scars on my fingers remind me that I don't miss the X-Acto knives. I'm also surprised that most of us survived the chemicals: fixer, fixative, Crystal Clear, rubber cement thinner, …
    in Scrunch! Comment by Cory Maylett 12:04AM
  • You're right, it would warp the plastic sheets and distort the letters if pressed too hard, but like I mentioned, it was the other end that was most useful. The ball end was only for pressing down the details. With some finesse, between the two ends…
    in Scrunch! Comment by Cory Maylett May 20
  • I thought I still had an old transfer type burnisher around here somewhere, but I seem to have thrown it away in one of my periodic cleaning frenzies. I found a photo online like the ones I typically used. The wide end was good for getting everythin…
    in Scrunch! Comment by Cory Maylett May 20
  • I didn't bother to look for comparisons like you've done, but you've found a good counterargument. 
    in Scrunch! Comment by Cory Maylett May 19
  • At the risk of belaboring this a bit, I'm not really suggesting this couldn't have been set with Letraset, I'm suggesting that there are several things about it that, instead, point to a photo typositor. 1. The designer could have used 72pt Letrase…
    in Scrunch! Comment by Cory Maylett May 19
  • My working career as a designer dates back to the '70s too, and I'd almost be willing to bet money that this was done in-house at an agency with a Photo Typositor or its equivalent. Rubdown letters were always a bit uneven with slightly wavy edges a…
    in Scrunch! Comment by Cory Maylett May 19
  • Great job. I love the lowercase. You've greatly improved on the logo that inspired your typeface. For that matter, you've greatly surpassed it, but... Your A is a bit unusual, you have a wide-open C, the bottom bar of the E is a bit long, and the …
  • Thomas Phinney, There will be 72 separate fonts in the family I'm finishing up (although I might leave out the 100 and 900 weights), which makes for a rather long drop-down menu. So yes, I too was paying attention to the way Adobe handled some of th…
  • Thank you Thomas. Yes, I mean 9 weights in each of three widths, which is what I wrote (I think, unless I'm misreading my own writing, which I've been known to do). I'll try to rephrase with example names: Option 1 (the one I prefer)      Albire…
  • Just a few subjective observations. The typeface is definitely not "ugly," but, in my opinion, might benefit from a few tweaks. I'm not entirely sure that your revised version doesn't introduce nearly as many problems as it solves. * The ends of …
  • I've been tempted to ask this exact same question here, so I have no answers. I do have some observations, though. In my professional work (I'm a graphic designer and art director), there are always deadlines — projects might be due by specific dat…
  • Just drawing out a little more information to lessen my ignorance. When a CSS weight is specified, it it just the name of the font that is used as the determiner of which web font the browser will display — not a parameter within the font itself? …
  • This MS GDI problem and the 250 weight workaround is new to me, so I have questions. Is the workaround to design the actual 200 weight class glyphs, but simply designate the font they're in as 250. What if there's a 100 weight in the family? Would …
  • Thank you Thomas, Hrant, Ray and Ben. Your thoughts and advice have mostly confirmed my own tentative thoughts. Thomas, I do own a copy of FontLab VI. I'm currently finishing up two families started in Glyphs during the rather buggy transition from…
  • Simon Cozens said: For example, in my perception, the tail of the /q looks more upright than the /l, even though they are parallel. Similarly for /u/l. Maybe you've been staring at it too long. The slant looks fine to me. 
  • All things considered, the inline .svg solution offered by Matthew is probably best since it can be done through the normal CMS content editor without the need for hacking and loading another font. Sizing problems with the .svg can be addressed us…
  • Well, it gets mixed in with the typography on a page as sort of a pseudo-typographic thing, I suppose. 
  • Here's a hurriedly built example of it being done, like I mentioned in my previous post.
  • It's a hack, but you could create a new, one-character web font, assign your custom symbol to the unicode position of your choice, upload it to your server, link to it from your section, then in the HTML/CSS, surround that character, wherever it ap…
  • They're typically created with styled horizontal rule
    tags, but I don't really think this particular use of horizontal rules has a name. As for their function, they can serve as organizational elements for the content, like identifying main …
  • Thomas Phinney said: Sure, and you should quite possibly include them because they are in those old encodings, and they still have some relevance for that reason. FontLab VI still has those old encodings. But if you are going to make a font…
  • Coincidentally, I've been working on a compressed, "flat-sided" family. Here's a sample of the most compressed upright weights.
  • I'm curious about what kinds of "issues" you're running into with them not working as expected in various apps and operating systems. Are you referring to how they look, how they render, how they are listed in menus or, maybe, all of the above and m…
  • Picking up on what John Savard  just wrote... There's likely no foolproof way to prevent piracy, but the fact that almost nothing is available to inhibit it is what concerns me. Adobe CC software, for example, needs to check back with Adobe over t…
  • As a graphic designer, I had always assumed that most fonts were purchased by people like me — other graphic designers. During the couple of years I've had fonts for sale on MyFonts and elsewhere, I've found my assumptions about who buys them haven'…
  • I like the diamonds, but because they're different, they do tend to draw attention to themselves and define the character of the typeface, which might be good or bad. What I'm really curious about are your question marks; they're squiggly in a not-…
  • I received a payment message from them earlier today followed by an unsolicited "Thanks for contacting us. We'll usually respond within 2 business days" message. Later, today I received a message asking me if I still wanted to stay on their mailing …
  • Do that, make those sites popular and Monotype will buy them up using the money they should have spent fixing MyFonts. Then they'll lower the royalty rates even further in an attempt to make their money back. 
  • Jeremiah Shoaf said: I am indeed talking about people renaming the actual font files, not just the name referenced in the CSS. Like changing it to "company-name.woff". If someone opens the file and changes the name of the font itself to …