Please list your favorite foreign looking Latin fonts



I have a soft spot for pseudoarabic fonts and am wondering: what are your personal favorites for Tibetan, Hebrew, Japanese etc. non-Latin fonts, and do you consider that they have a good market niche.

2. I am also going to shoehorn a question that is not typographic, but we are a fairly educated bunch: I read a brief footnote somewhere that, in Muslim miniature, there is some kind of rhyming of colors, e.g. the color of the shirt of one person in the miniature is mirrored in another one's trouser or the like, and if you connect all such binomes in the picture the lines pass more or less trough a single point or object, for example a carpet that has all the mentioned colors. Does anybody have more information on the matter in a language that is not Arabic? I have literally hurt my head looking for information.

Comments

  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 124
    edited April 28

    (sorry for so amateurishly butchering of the artwork)
    Please note how different pieces of clothing are the same color.
    ____________________________
    Also, sometimes a single Arabic letter intrudes deep into the drawing. Does this technique have a name?
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 124
    edited April 28
    (Edited) Maybe I should clarify: I am looking for a list of names of Latin fonts that imitate what are over here qualified as "exotic" scripts, this means almost everything besides Latin, Cyrillic and Greek. The DaFont category is "Foreign look". Lao, Hiragana, Katakana, kanji, Hebrew, Arabic, and so on. There are plenty of bad examples around, but I would like to see the good ones - and the pros in a type forum could give the best! :)

    The USSR had a sizable Muslim population so there are good Cyrillic pseudoarabic gems, but almost exclusively artwork for books, not fonts per se.
  • Nick ShinnNick Shinn Posts: 1,273
    An image search for “chop suey font” will deliver many!

    **

    I’ve always liked Ernst Schneidler’s Legende of 1937, perhaps because it is more connotative than denotative… subtle and evocative, rather than hitting one over the head.
    (Image swiped from Luc Devroye)
  • Thank you for starting this thread!
  • Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 124
    The USSR had a sizable Muslim population so there are good Cyrillic pseudoarabic gems, but almost exclusively artwork for books, not fonts per se.

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