[OTVar] Baseline curvature axis?

Belleve InvisBelleve Invis Posts: 252
edited April 2018 in Technique and Theory
This is for the text being placed on a curve.
When a glyph is placed on a curve, locally each glyph is placed on a circular arc (in either inside or outside), so we could register its signed curvature as an OTVar axis.
The value assignment would look like this:

Comments

  • Belleve InvisBelleve Invis Posts: 252
    edited April 2018
    Also the vertical version :|

  • Interesting: it could provide a way for connecting scripts to remain connected when set on a path without badly distorting the text.

    But it would probably also be very hard to implement, and it's not clear how much it would be used / what the felt need is.
  • John HudsonJohn Hudson Posts: 1,585
    Is the assumption that the curve is always an arc of a circle? Text-to-curve is a subset of text-to-path, and a curve to which text is applied might not be an arc of a circle, or might be a complex path made up of segments of different curvature.
  • Belleve InvisBelleve Invis Posts: 252
    edited April 2018
    Is the assumption that the curve is always an arc of a circle? Text-to-curve is a subset of text-to-path, and a curve to which text is applied might not be an arc of a circle, or might be a complex path made up of segments of different curvature.
    "locally arc". Which means that a complex curve could be broken into a series of arcs approximately.
  • Hrant H. PapazianHrant H. Papazian Posts: 1,284
    edited April 2018
    I had this idea back in the MM days. Ideal for cartography... and trendy logos. Check out the "Z" in this example, for starters:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/jfsampsonphotos/29175540013

    This is the type of thing that would validate the existence of variable fonts, versus the mere repackaging of weight/width/yawn.

    It would be great to see Illustrator et alia hand over the curvature of the path to the font, and the font choosing its instance accordingly. Probably too dreamy, although not impossible.
  • That would be a lot of work, given how non-linear that transformation would be.

    This is the type of thing that would validate the existence of variable fonts, versus the mere repackaging of weight/width/yawn.
    Now I want to make a typeface with a yawn axis.
  • A yaw axis.
  • Am I understanding this correctly? The typesetting application would place the glyphs on a circle/curve, and pass the local curvature value to the ‘curv’ axis so the font can apply an optical correction to the glyphs, e.g. make the glyphs narrower at the baseline?



    Then the glyph variations should be mostly linear. Maybe an axis mapping (avar table) would be necessary to make sure the desired angles are applied when the glyphs are spaced very tightly.
  • Jens KutilekJens Kutilek Posts: 204
    edited April 2018
    A font with circular compensation was presented at TypoLabs, and some people seemed to be confused about whether the font itself would contain the displacement and rotation of the glyphs to place them on a circle. The demo fonts on the website don't contain this axis though. The effect can be seen in the coin samples.

  • Hrant H. PapazianHrant H. Papazian Posts: 1,284
    edited April 2018
    The typesetting application would place the glyphs on a circle/curve, and pass the local curvature value to the ‘curv’ axis so the font can apply an optical correction to the glyphs
    Yes. Please.

    Besides cartography and hip logos, such an axis would also be super useful in animation, VR...

    And another cool example:

  • Hrant, I know that you meant it that way, but not sure if Belleve also intended it this way, and Christian’s comment about the non-linear transformation can be interpreted so that he also understood it differently.

  • Then the glyph variations should be mostly linear. Maybe an axis mapping (avar table) would be necessary to make sure the desired angles are applied when the glyphs are spaced very tightly.
    It would be complex in cursive scripts like Arabic (which would benefit most from such axes) as one would need to change the curvature of the horizontal stems as well.
  • Hrant H. PapazianHrant H. Papazian Posts: 1,284
    edited April 2018
    @Khaled Hosny I agree Arabic would indeed benefit more than Latin. But Latin also has horizontals, which generally could avoid being bent only within a very narrow range.

  • Hrant, I know that you meant it that way, but not sure if Belleve also intended it this way, and Christian’s comment about the non-linear transformation can be interpreted so that he also understood it differently.
    The axis' definition is the curvature with a scale (1/em for 1000).
    However, using AVAR or whatever new table proposal (like XVAR or my ZVAR) could be used to simplify the working process.
  • A very nice specimen, captured in Fargo (ND) by Nikki Villagomez:


  • Hrant, incredibly nice indeed. I wonder if it's possible to put a date on this design. Could it be true 1920s Art Deco? (In which case I might get arrested for trying to pry it loose with a crowbar...)

    Wikipedia tells me the city of Fargo is no stranger to Art Deco, as it sports a contemporary theatre in that style.
  • Simon CozensSimon Cozens Posts: 328
    Never really saw the need for this axis until today.

  • Hrant H. PapazianHrant H. Papazian Posts: 1,284
    edited May 2018
    @Theunis de Jong Let me ask Nikki. BTW it looks like it says "JACK YOUNG ASSOCIATES" and "MILWAUKEE WIS" along the edges...
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