Context of Diacritics

Hello type folks!

I'm very excited to announce that Context of Diacritics — an analysis of diacritics made to help you with adding diacritics to your ligatures — is finally up and running. Check it out here: http://urtd.net/projects/cod/

I look forward to your feedback.

Cheers, Ondrej
cod.jpg 127.8K

Comments

  • Thanks! That should be helpful!
  • Nick ShinnNick Shinn Posts: 1,193
    edited August 2013
    “What language uses the most letters with diacritics?”

    Is that per alphabet or per written text?
    Also, are polytonic Greek marks considered diacritics?
  • It is per text, probably it should be noted somewhere on the page.

    This time I only focused on Latin, didn't give Greek much thought. I'll see if I can do it in the future.
  • Great work Ondrej!

    Here you have one more to add to your "words by base pairs" list: Sofía. My daughter's name, the /f/iacute pair always breaking fonts :)
  • Ahh, those f words again :-)
  • Nick ShinnNick Shinn Posts: 1,193
    My daughter’s name: Zoë.
    More English diacritics:
    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:English_words_with_diacritics
  • Thanks Nick, nice resource, I didn't know about it. I didn't include English in the database, because the diacritics is only used in loanwords and those are covered in the analysis of the respective source languages.

    The project is less about mapping individual languages and more about listing all existing diacritical combinations. I'm sure all combinations used in English loanwords are already in the database.
  • James PuckettJames Puckett Posts: 1,472
    It’s important to remember that just because a letter combination does appear in a dictionary does not mean that said combination does not exist. Names of people and places tend to break the rules that apply to other kinds of words.

    That said, this is a useful tool!
  • Jack JenningsJack Jennings Posts: 148
    edited August 2013
    From a cursory reading of the list: coördinate, coöperate, preëminent, reëlect, reënter, reëstablish, daïs, zoölogy, oölogy, and oöcyte.

    I'm sure all of these spellings/words are extremely rare, but I don't think these would be considered loan words (or at least not particularly recent ones) and each contains a diacritic combination that doesnt seem to be present in other languages…

    Great resource none the less though!
  • As I said earlier: The project is less about mapping individual languages and more about listing all existing diacritical combinations. I'm sure all combinations used in English loanwords are already in the database.

    http://urtd.net/projects/cod/combinations/o_odieresis
    http://urtd.net/projects/cod/combinations/e_edieresis
  • The second “umlauted” vocal is part of the New Yorker’s house style.
  • Nick ShinnNick Shinn Posts: 1,193
    edited August 2013
    Dude, no ndieresis?
  • I missed fð.
  • From a cursory reading of the list: coördinate, coöperate, preëminent, reëlect, reënter, reëstablish, daïs, zoölogy, oölogy, and oöcyte.
    Jack, I'd be surprised if the "New Yorker" did not use all of those as part of its composition style.
  • Thank you Ondrej, this is sweet!
  • James I think their style guide might actually require one of those in each article printed. They pay their writers on a per-diaeresis basis.
  • Ondrej, congratulations! Very useful tool.
  • Nick ShinnNick Shinn Posts: 1,193
    It should be spelled diëresis, dammit!
    At least, that‘s how I’ve always pronounced it, rather than “die-resis”.
  • Dusan JelesijevicDusan Jelesijevic Posts: 20
    edited February 2014
    In Serbia people also use Latin, beside Cyrillic.
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