Reviving Type

A book on the calibration of mind and eye, to be presented at ATypI 2019 Tokyo: https://www.voordekunst.nl/projecten/8890-reviving-type-1

Comments

  • That looks a very useful project. Are them your students?
  • I will be happy to support this work, but the PayPal link is not working. Frank, please let the project planners know they need to fix this!
  • Hi Claudio, yes, Céline and Nóra were KABK LetterStudio students of mine, who did for a couple of semesters research in the context of the ‘Revival of a historic Renaissance typeface’ module.

    Hi Scott, thanks for your interest and for letting me know that the PayPal link is not working. I informed Nóra and Céline in the meantime and hopefully it will be fixed soon.
  • Hrant H. PapazianHrant H. Papazian Posts: 1,516
    I'm with Unger.
  • Hi Claudio, yes, Céline and Nóra were KABK LetterStudio students of mine, who did for a couple of semesters research in the context of the ‘Revival of a historic Renaissance typeface’ module.
    Thanks, it looks really interesting. But from the description it seems focused on specific period (older) types. Are they approaching the presentation focusing on specific typefaces they were working on?
    I ask because the topic in general is always very relevant, but clearly reviving an early inkunabula or renaissance typeface is a task with different evaluations involved than – say – reviving a 19th century face.
  • Hi Hrant, it is a fact that Gerard was not really a fan of revivals, as was, for example, Van Krimpen. However, even if one is for this reason not interested in Céline’s and Nóra’s final interpretations of the models from Garamont, Granjon, and Kis in question, one perhaps could be interested in the process that led to the revivals still, I reckon. As I wrote in the foreword:

    ‘By marking the historical and technological boundaries of the punchcutters’ profession and practice, and by stimulating a critical and analytical way of thinking, graphic-design students should be able to acquire a deeper insight in the historical development of the typographic métier. Research, whether scientfically based and/or empirically oriented, will generate additional knowledge on the fundamentals of typography and will undoubtedly teach us more than we would learn through merely optically reproducing the historical letter forms.
            In this book Nóra and Céline describe and discuss their empirical type-revival processes. Their research can be considered as a sophisticated attempt to calibrate mind and eye. The result provides in-depth insight in their revival processes, forming a guide for further research into the fundamentals of historical type, and it functions as a cookbook for those who want to transfer their findings into a digital type revival. Above all, this book is a wonderful example of the high level of study possible at bachelor level graphic-design courses, such as at the Royal Academy of Art in the Hague.’
  • Not sure I understand what you were talking about as far as Unger goes… :-(
  • As mentioned, Gerard was not very fond of revivals. However, he intensively researched historical material for a couple of his typefaces, including, for example, DTL Paradox. In the introduction of the DTL Paradox type specimen from 2002 I referred to this and mentioned that Gerard filtered details from illustrious precursors to mix with his strong, and contemporary idiom.
  • As mentioned, Gerard was not very fond of revivals. However, he intensively researched historical material for a couple of his typefaces, including, for example, DTL Paradox. In the introduction of the DTL Paradox type specimen from 2002 I referred to this and mentioned that Gerard filtered details from illustrious precursors to mix with his strong, and contemporary idiom.
    I’d love to back up Céline’s and Nóra’s project, but just wished to understand better. Have you seen my question above? (But I guess in part you kinda replied in your reply to Hrant).

    As for Unger’s approach: while I admire him a lot, and he surely left a great legacy, when I first saw Capitolium I told myself: what? Two thousand years of christianity, history and culture where it incarnated, are supposed be distilled in such an impersonal typeface for signage? It was a very refined, but such an "impersonal" and cold typeface to me… I have the firm convinction that you do not need to be "aseptic" to reinterpret/interpret something for a new context.
    http://www.gerardunger.com/fontstore/store-capitolium-news.html

    Alverata is wonderful, anyway. But for the 2000 Jubilaeum, well, when I saw Capitolium I said «why?». But again, Gerard was Dutch, the aesthetic is closely tied to our cultural roots.
  • Paradox: so “quintessentially Unger”! :-)
    Very nice, but I’d have a hard time using it… Again, a cultural matter?
    I don‘t know, because I’d use Quadraat everywhere, and Smejiers is Dutch as well.
  • Hrant H. PapazianHrant H. Papazian Posts: 1,516
    edited June 15
    Claudio Piccinini said:
    Capitolium .... was a very refined, but such an "impersonal" and cold typeface to me…
    Maybe that's why they never actually deployed it? (But that's just guesswork.)
  • Maybe that's why they never actually deployed it? (But that's just guesswork.)
    I don’t know, but now you that you make me think about it, I believe I read something about it. And maybe I can discover more about this. Hm…
  • The success of, and the opinion about, Gerard Unger’s types and idiom deserve a dedicated topic on TypeDrawers, I reckon. I consider Gerard’s view on revivals in the context of Reviving Types only relevant for the clear positioning of the book’s content.
    […] clearly reviving an early inkunabula or renaissance typeface is a task with different evaluations involved than […]
    That could be well possible. Reviving Types is a combination of, and a comparison between, two different case studies that started independently from each other: Céline’s investigation of French Renaissance type and Nóra’s research into Baroque type. When both studies were completed at the LetterStudio, I asked Céline and Nóra to compare the processes and outcomes of both studies, especially to outline similarities and possible differences in approaching and reviving French Renaissance and Baroque type.

    Undoubtedly these two case studies will cover aspects of reviving historical type outside the two style periods and the specific models in question. Inevitably, however, there will be uncovered aspects too.
  • […] clearly reviving an early inkunabula or renaissance typeface is a task with different evaluations involved than […]
    Undoubtedly these two case studies will cover aspects of reviving historical type outside the two style periods and the specific models in question. Inevitably, however, there will be uncovered aspects too.
    Definitely worth backing then, I’ll manage to do so. :-)

    Agreed on Unger, we were going off-topic.
  • I am pleased to report that the sign-up and PayPal link is working! 
  • Done. I hope they reach their goal. :)
  • Adam KingAdam King Posts: 7
    Just bumping this up ... in case someone wants to donate that hasn't. I'm, hopefully, going to take them over the top.
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