Ergam CJK

Vasil StanevVasil Stanev Posts: 201
edited August 27 in Type Design Critiques
;)



I am Learning Mandarin as I design the glyphs in FL6, found a very polite and nice Chinese guy at my home city (and in exchange he's gonna be tought my native language by me :) ). What I am interested in is smart glyphs the best way to save myself work, and how do I calibrate them for a CJK font.

I know there are some issues with the stroke width, but I will clear this up in the process. I'll let the design lead itself.

I do not know if a single font can support 84 thousand glyphs, but I will try to build up to 6000 and the rest will be released in pro versions depending on sales. That's my plan.

Comments

  • I think the typeface is interesting and unusual - not like a native person with years of (forced by schools...) encumbered use of writing with the brush and the inherited esthetic values from teachers, etc. That's a refreshing thing. Well done.
  • I think the typeface is interesting and unusual - not like a native person with years of (forced by schools...) encumbered use of writing with the brush and the inherited esthetic values from teachers, etc. That's a refreshing thing. Well done.
    What is the main manual for CJK type design? What is the "Elements of style" for CJK? is it available in English?
  • Perhaps Ken Lunde is the person to ask.

    I have been reading a book about the world's writing, and it is quite interesting to see how writing style is influenced by the tools/medium. An SE Asian script have circular strokes because it was traditionally written with a stylus on palm leaves; cuneiform was written that way because it was written in wet clay with a wedge etc.

    Most of Chinese scripts were in brushes; but some are wood craftings or some carvings, and others are bronze casts. And the oracle (bone/ tortoise shell) scripts, are all influenced by the medium and evolved with a style suited to that medium.
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