New approaches of Arabic and English typeface, Please your feedback



I would like to share with you a new Arabic and English typeface under the name "AK Riyadh Sans", The font has a compatible in both languages Arabic and English with nice and modern shapes.

Here you can find the font presentation with all details: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MrX3WgyPbsI2

Also, I'm looking to see your feedback to updated and develop the font from all the sides to go ahead and make the best.

Best regards, 
Abdullah


Comments

  • Have you looked at the work of Yanone?
    https://www.yanone.de/fonts/
  • John SavardJohn Savard Posts: 132
    edited August 15
    I'm confused. The video showed the English upper-case alphabet, and one character from the Arabic set. This is not enough for me to really say anything about the typeface.

    Mostly, it was simply a visual presentation of statements about how wonderful the typeface would be, not of details about it.

    Have you looked at the work of Yanone?
    https://www.yanone.de/fonts/

    Perhaps you were referring to the typeface Amman? That is the only one there that seems to be sort of in the same group as the proposed one.
  • John: I spotted a bunch of Arabic glyphs in the video between 8-12 seconds into it. There was also a lone Arabic glyph at 52 seconds.

    But yes, the Arabic was barely shown and only in passing, the video was 1:23 long and 0:05 of that showed the Arabic. It was more of a marketing piece that didn't really show the Arabic much.
  • krizimkrizim Posts: 3
    Hi Guys, 

    Thank you for your feedback please check the quick review of this font.
  • Simon CozensSimon Cozens Posts: 252
    I'm not really sure what I'm looking at here. Is it meant to look a bit hand-drawn, a bit crude and bumpy? If so, that's fine, it's a legitimate aesthetic - although perhaps you could rough the /d up a bit; the inside bowl is too lovely. If not, take a look at the curves on, say, the arches of the /n and the /h.

    I can't really speak to the Arabic but it seems (to me at least) cleaner and less crude than the Latin. Compare the smoothness of the /dad-ar with the bumpiness of the /R. I don't know if that's a good match. Maybe tell us a bit more about your design idea?

    Are the feet of the /d and /a (and the /h and the /n) supposed to look different? Again if you're going for crude and hand-drawn, that's probably OK.

    The outer leg join of the /R looks to be at the wrong angle - should be going in to match the lower part of the bowl, so heading south-west instead of west.

    Do you have a full Latin alphabet yet or are you still developing it?
  • krizimkrizim Posts: 3
    I'm not really sure what I'm looking at here. Is it meant to look a bit hand-drawn, a bit crude and bumpy? If so, that's fine, it's a legitimate aesthetic - although perhaps you could rough the /d up a bit; the inside bowl is too lovely. If not, take a look at the curves on, say, the arches of the /n and the /h.

    I can't really speak to the Arabic but it seems (to me at least) cleaner and less crude than the Latin. Compare the smoothness of the /dad-ar with the bumpiness of the /R. I don't know if that's a good match. Maybe tell us a bit more about your design idea?

    Are the feet of the /d and /a (and the /h and the /n) supposed to look different? Again if you're going for crude and hand-drawn, that's probably OK.

    The outer leg join of the /R looks to be at the wrong angle - should be going in to match the lower part of the bowl, so heading south-west instead of west.

    Do you have a full Latin alphabet yet or are you still developing it?
    Thank you for your feedback, I used the hand-drawn harmonized lines at all angles with specific angles for all characters.

    I will take your comment to improve all letters as soon as possible.

    Here you can find full Arabic and English glyphs: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ikv4xga3s9s7ujd/AAClH9GJgSGyiANv3IeuH4X5a?dl=0

    Thanks, 
  • Sahar AfsharSahar Afshar Posts: 6
    edited August 20
    I'm sure others can comment on the Latin much better than myself, but as for the Arabic, by giving it a little bit of time and love you can make vast improvements: 

    - I would adjust the height of them lam to match the alef, this creates unnecessary white space in a line of text, especially if you plan to use this with a latin in side by side paragraphs. The Arabic will end up looking much smaller.  

    - If you're going to give the meem a somewhat stencil feel, I would mimic how the character is actually written in terms of where that cut (or instroke) is placed--which would be at the top of the letter. I understand that we all have our personal preferences for how we write characters and this is based on handwriting, but considering a wider audience, it's probably best to stick with a majority of people do, in this case calligraphy would be the standard to use a reference perhaps. Also I would probably add this feature somewhere else, and not just in one character. I'm also not seeing it in the Latin. I apologize if it's somewhere else already, I haven't looked at the entire character, this is all just based on the picture you've posted above. Because I'm not seeing it anywhere else right now, my suggestion would be to just remove it from the meem as well.
    And while we're on the meem, I personally feel that it's a shame that most people decide on a circular shape, when really, if broken down to it's geometric basics, the meem is truly more of a triangle. But that's personal preference I suppose. 

    - Some proportions need adjustments. Your final ya is tiny compared to the generous meem or waw or final ha. 

    - I'm not entirely sure what the logic behind the style is. It's a bit inconsistent, and to me it looks a bit like someone was writing a sentence with their dominant hand and then midway switched to the other hand and wrote the initial meem and final ayn, then switched back again. Perhaps a bit more consistency in whatever direction you decide to take it, whether it's behaving itself more or looks more crude? 

    - The ascenders can probably be a bit shorter to match the color better with that of the Latin. But then I'd give it a bit more space, because the word groups are sitting a bit too tightly next to each other. 

    Finally I would say that the dots seem too close to their base characters in some instances, and the dot of the medial ghayn seems to be taking a bit of a tumble off the left side of the letter. 

    These are the things that come to mind initially, but it seems to me that like I said, it needs work. There are also smaller things like if you push back the dots on the initial ya you can then space it better next to the final reh and eliminate the white space, or that the stroke widths need some refining, etc.

    Hope that's helpful and not overwhelming:)
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